Why we should invest money in educating girls

Why we should invest money in educating girls

September 20, 2019 0 By Ronny Jaskolski


Investing in girls’ education
is not only socially fair, but makes economic sense. The World Bank
estimates that failure to complete school
costs countries more than $15tn in lost
productivity and earnings. In poorer countries, 132m girls
between the ages of six and 17 are not being educated. Two-thirds of the world’s
illiterate adults are women. Girls who drop out
of school early have fewer chances to
earn a better living and help their communities. They’re more likely to marry and
have children at a young age, putting them and their infants
at greater risk of infection, illness, and death. Around the world, 41,000 girls
aged under 18 marry every day. Those marrying before
18 are six times as likely to live in poverty in
later life as those who do not. In poor countries, improving
the education of girls means building schools
near their homes and hiring the right teachers. Free schooling, transport,
uniforms, and textbooks can also help. In India, paying more money
to teachers in rural schools who were confirmed as
showing up for work sharply cut their absenteeism
and increased students’ test scores. The RISE programme in Ghana
focuses on children who have never been in school or
who have dropped out. To help the girls, classes
are held in the afternoons to fit in with household
chores and farming. In countries such as
Tanzania, the charity Camfed targets the most disadvantaged
girls in rural areas. It offers bursaries,
study guides, life skills, and social support to help
pupils and keep them in school. At current rates
of improvement, it will take 170
years for the world to reach economic parity
between the sexes. Investing in girls’ education
is good for them, for all school children, and makes
economic and social sense for society as a whole.