State Education: Indoctrination in Teaching—How to Solve the Problem of Education

State Education: Indoctrination in Teaching—How to Solve the Problem of Education

September 15, 2019 12 By Ronny Jaskolski


When you look at the history of the state
education system as a whole, it was used to politically indoctrinate society to target
the youth so that when they leave school, they become subservient to the state. Now,
this is really no different, if you look back to the seventeenth century, people were kept
in the dark, they were ill-informed, uneducated, they were not able to freely read or write
and, therefore, it was easier to control society as a whole to make them live in servitude.
Well, this was really no different to that of the twentieth century through these, you
know, fascist and communist regimes; you saw it with Nazi Germany where they used state
education: “The Nazis moved quickly to control education and the schools. They recognised
that a new generation of supporters would be critical to their success. Responsibility
for carrying out the educational goals of the Nazi Party fell to the National Socialist
Teachers League (the NSLB) the Ministry of Education and the Hitler youth. The NSLB was
responsible for indoctrinating educators in the fundamentals of the Nazi ideology.” As
well, of course, in the Soviet Union and, of course, these two regimes alone had banned
books like that of Friedrich A. Von Hayek’s book, ‘A Road to Serfdom.’ Now, the reason
why they would keep information away from them is because a freer and better-educated
society is then able to see through the lies of such a regime and so, what the communist
regimes would do, is they would banish this idea of there being a God and the Christian
religion, or whatever other religion and they would get people to believe through indoctrination
that the state is the God and, therefore, living in servitude. You will hear the arguments
much like that of universal healthcare, you hear it all the time with that of the NHS
where people say that it’s available for everyone. Well, that’s the same arguments that you will
hear for, you know, free education and even, you know, it’s more affordable for everyone,
these are the arguments you hear for anything universal; universal healthcare; universal
education. It’s always a case that it’s more affordable and it’s available for everyone,
that’s the arguments that you hear, but what you actually find is is the very fact that
there is a lot of neglect. Now, the United States of America is really no different to
the poor education within Scotland, for example; you have a lot of subjects that are being
taught that are useless. They’re not really preparing people for the actual real world
out there. Kids that go off to college or university and they are studying these other
subjects that are completely worthless that will get them no job at the end of it, however,
they’ll end up in student debt. A large amount of student debt. Now, you could go back to
the nineteenth century of the United States of America when they did have a free market
education system and they had a 95 percent literacy rate on average. Now, it wasn’t a
case that you would have these classroom sizes with about 30 different pupils where the teacher
cannot get round every single pupil at a time. And I know from experience having gone through
state education in Scotland where, in my time, through 6-years of high school, we must have
went through about 110 different teachers and many of the teachers that would come in
as fill-in teachers, wouldn’t even have a clue about the subject and they would just
tell you to get on with your work. And if you’re stuck for something and you’re trying
to get help, they can’t really help you the same. And even then, you had a case where
sometimes the teacher would leave the classroom and he wouldn’t even be there for you to be
able to ask questions. When I was studying Travel and Tourism, I got an answer correct,
however, because my answer in an assessment paper did not match what the government board
were looking for, they told me to redo it and redo the assessment on a second attempt.
Now, you only get about 3 attempts, or something? I re-sat my assessment and I had to change
my answer to suit what the government was wanting. It’s not teaching kids to think critically,
it’s not teaching kids to think for themselves, it’s pretty much teaching kids in a linear
though process that it must suit government and what government says is right. One of
the most pervasive arguments you’re going to hear in favour of state education is that
it’s too expensive to go private and, therefore, it’s available for everyone, it’s more affordable
if it’s free and, therefore, if you’ve got free tuition fees to universities; if you’ve
got free this, free that, then, of course, it’s available for everyone there. But people
don’t understand that there’s a price that you pay for that, a very heavy price and you
pay for it by compensating in other areas of the economy. I’ve already explained much
of that, I gave the example before to state that even when it came to the university degree
to study photography, there was only 11 placements available because the placements have been
cutback. And even employment opportunity is cutback in order to compensate paying for
the so-called free stuff. Now, of course, that was 11 placements during a period when
it was only free tuition fees to that of people in Britain in Scotland, shall I say. Well,
it’s now a case that the SNP has made free tuition fees to foreign students coming to
Scotland. So, they’re getting to live at the expense off our taxpayers and there’s going
to be a very heavy cost for that. This argument that you’ll hear, again, you could relate
this to the laws of supply and demand because, take for example, the United States; in 1996
there was 44,000 applicants for medical school, but there was only 16,000 placements available.
That means that the cost is going to be very expensive. The demand for placements far outstrips
the supply. So, you might say then: “Okay, well why don’t you just build more medical
schools.” Well, that’s what we would want to do, but as a result of a government created
monopoly, then, of course, it led to the closure of all those medical schools. Well, it’s the
same thing with regards to education in this country. So, there’s a wonderful TED Talk
by a woman in Glasgow that spoke about the private education in many of the poorer countries.
It destroys that argument to say this is why we need so-called free education system. In
fact, what you’ll find is is that, no different to free market healthcare in the nineteenth
century of the United States, the free market education system was dirt cheap and, of course,
the standards of education is far greater. How you improve the education system is by,
not just greatly reducing the costs and making more placements available, it’s about getting
rid of these subjects that really serve no purpose and have no end value, will not get
people jobs at the end of it. You know, there’s nothing stopping people learning these subjects
independently, anyway and there’s probably a wealth of information out there. They should
be encouraged to do, you know, apprenticeships, etc. So they don’t need to go to university
or whatnot. That’s how you improve and like I said, with the classroom of about 30 different
pupils, well, in a free market education system, it’s different, they’re able to get around
students one-by-one. That’s why I support the free market education system, it would
improve the quality of education, it would give a wider market, it would certainly create
choice for students and it’s more efficient. So, if you’ve got any questions that you would
like to ask me, comment in the comment sections below and I’ll be sure to get back to you.
Don’t forget to like the video, share the video and, of course, subscribe and thank
you for watching and I shall talk to you’s later, cheers!