Sports families complicate talk of educational advantage | IN 60 SECONDS

Sports families complicate talk of educational advantage | IN 60 SECONDS

December 9, 2019 2 By Ronny Jaskolski


The sports world is full of accomplished
competitors. In many cases, it’s a family affair. Two-time NBA MVP Steph Curry, and
reigning NFL MVP Patrick Mahomes, had dads who played pro ball. The father of
iconic New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick literally wrote the book on
coaching. Indeed, having a parent who was a professional athlete turns out to be a
huge leg up when it comes to pursuing this glamorous, lucrative line of work.
How should we feel about this? And how should it inform our thoughts about
educational equity? On the one hand, it’s patently unfair. Some children get a huge
head start. On the other hand, parents will inevitably share passions, knowledge,
and natural gifts with their children. In fact, doing so is pretty much the
definition of good parenting. There are a host of troubling ways in which
advantage is reproduced, but there are also organic, socially beneficial ways in
which responsible parents may incidentally advantage their children,
and well-meaning reformers committed to educational equity need to respect that
complicated reality. What lessons do you think sports can teach about equity and
advantage? Let us know in the comments. Also, let us know what other topics you’d
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