Singleton Primary School : Foundation students learn money basics

Singleton Primary School : Foundation students learn money basics

October 4, 2019 0 By Ronny Jaskolski


>>So Moneysmart
is a really important program to introduce kids to
at a very young age. Kids need to have exposure
and experiences to handle money. We live in a world
where we don’t see money very often; we have cards that are swiped and internet purchases that bring shopping to our house. And so kids needs to have that exposure to handle the money, and to have the experiences of seeing how money is earned, and what we do with money, and that jobs earn money, and that we need to budget money, and that we have needs, that we need to purchase
some things we need. Then we have wants,
that we want to purchase things. And if we start teaching kids
at a very early age, then they will just build and build
and build on their skills to become Moneysmart people
in the future.>>How do we earn money?
What do you do to earn money? Yes?>>I cleaned up my room.
>>You clean up your room? And what do you get
when you clean up your room?>>Two dollars.
>>Two dollars.>>Who can tell me what their favorite
game is to play at school? [Chloe?]?
Their money game?>>[INAUDIBLE]>>No, you’re right.
>>To shop.>>The shopping.
What do you like doing in the shop?>>Being the waitress.
>>Excellent. And what do you have
to do to be a waitress?>>You get the food.
>>For who?>>The customers.
>>Excellent!>>So we set up a shop in our classroom.
We were doing a sea theme, so we leave it to them
with the Moneysmart program. And we decided that the kids
needed to learn about jobs, the jobs that were out in society, and what the roles
of those different jobs were.>>I’m a chef.
>>I’m a shopkeeper.>>I am the waiter.
>>We’re the visitors.>>So we created an area where the kids
could practice those skills. So we had waitresses,
and we’ve taught the kids what’s involved
in being a waitress, and that they take orders,
and they take money. And we have shopkeepers,
and they practiced — the visitors would come through
and they’d purchase products. And they would then have
to read the label, and then go through
and pay for each item. We had a chef, they were cooking foods
in the background. And we talked about
that they weren’t handling money, that they would —
they got paid to do that job. We have the [INAUDIBLE] game, where the kids identify and find coins. They identify values of money, and they’re practicing
their oral language skills of describing how — what a coin looks like, and then
their partner has to find it. So we use —
we talk about size, we talk about color,
we talk about animals and we talk about numbers
that are on coins. It’s a hands-on approaching to teaching. It’s a life skill that they need, and it’s really important for kids to have that experience
of handling money. And it’s easy to adapt the program into — across curriculum.