SIDS is Personal for Nurse Who Works to Educate New Moms

SIDS is Personal for Nurse Who Works to Educate New Moms

October 6, 2019 3 By Ronny Jaskolski


Before I had my baby I never thought it
would happen to me. Austin was born at 33 weeks. We spent 26
days in the Renown NICU fighting every day. It was two steps forward one step
back constantly but he did get to come home after 26 days so I woke up that
morning to feed him and we were both exhausted. We laid down in my bed and we
fell asleep and when I woke up he was already gone. It was absurd to me because
I was a nurse – I knew better than to sleep with my baby. I knew better than to
put myself in that position but I was also still a new mom and I was still
trying to take care of my baby and myself and unfortunately lost my baby to
an unsafe sleep environment. This is a book we like to give our new moms and it
talks about safe sleep. We want you to have a good foundation when you go home
so we’re gonna give you this book to take home and read to Zachary. I love
being able to educate and help my new moms. When we come in, we always talk
about that they have this bassinet and that is the baby’s area to sleep. Moms
love to do skin-to-skin – they want to cuddle and they want to breastfeed but
they’re also exhausted. Some of them just had a major abdominal surgery and they
need to recover as well. So if we can tell them, “we want you to do skin-to-skin,
we want you to breastfeed but when you’re tired
let somebody else hold the baby or put the baby in the bassinet – that’s the
baby’s safe sleep spot.” I don’t normally just come out and say that I’ve lost a
child to SIDS. A lot of times it comes out after I’ve seen them in a not safe
sleep environment. I’ll come in and the baby will be sleeping on mom and mom’s
drowsy, or I’ll come in the baby’s sleeping on a pillow in bed with mom and
I just say, “you know, we really encourage safe sleep practices here at Renown.”
It’s the ones that come back at me with, “well I’m just so tired,” or “I did it
with all my other babies,” and that’s when I try to relate it to: “I thought I
was invincible too and I never thought it would happen to me
but you don’t want it to happen to you.” Weston is my second baby since I lost
Austin. So the ABCs would be alone, on their back and in a crib. The crib should
not have a bunch of stuff in it. It should be pretty much a sheet and the
crib itself. I do put Weston in a safe sleep swaddler and they can have a
pacifier when they’re not sleeping. There’s also breastfeeding, there’s tummy
time, there’s snuggling but the biggest thing is I always try to breastfeed him
at night in a chair sitting up to stay awake cuz that’s how I lost my baby was
sleeping while breastfeeding. When I lost Austin is I wanted to be a difference. I
wanted to be someone that they could say “I heard your story and I don’t want
it to happen to me.” This April he would have been five so
this birthday is creeping up on me and it’s getting harder as we get closer. I
feel like talking about my story helps keep his memory alive.