Schooling in Adolescence Project: FSW 481

Schooling in Adolescence Project: FSW 481

September 20, 2019 0 By Ronny Jaskolski


Schooling in Adolescence by Connor Lake, Annie
Darragh, Kelli Kahle, and Clarissa Staley. Why is this issue important?“Throughout
adolescence we develop into the adult’s that mold our societies future both through
graduating into the dominating population in the workforce and becoming one of the greatest
influential factors on younger generations. Schooling during one’s teen years is a critical
element to their growth and development. The school environment influences a teen’s
development both socially, cognitively, and emotionally. Over the years attending school has become
more and more of a social norm or even part of the law in particular countries like the
United States. In our country, all states require children
to complete all schooling between 1st grade and the adolescent’s sixteenth birthday. Some states even require children to attend
Kindergarten as well. Since there are nine or ten mandatory years
of schooling, schools do have some sort of an impact on adolescent development. The school topic is much greater than what
physically occurs at the place of learning. Those in contact with adolescents such as
parents, teachers, neighbors, and other adults these adolescents interact with, all experienced
schooling as well and are able to relate and share stories with the growing teenager outside
the school setting. Also, for inactive, antisocial adolescents,
most of their social interactions develop within a school setting (Santrock, 2016). Not only are schools relevant to development,
but also is the place where significant issues in development arise.” The first issue we find in adolescence in
schooling is the No Child Left Behind Act. “The No Child Left Behind act was written
by George W. Bush, one of our former presidents. Bush signed this new act in 2001 in hopes
that it would help increase the academic achievement of the United States compared to other highly
achieving countries. Two downsides of this act are that the No
Child Left Behind Act increases the amounts of assessment and progress reports in schools
and more funding goes into assessments, meaning funding is taken out of other areas of the
school such as music, arts, and physical education programs. The budget cuts are the reasons as to why
many schools are taking away their arts, music, and physical education programs. The No Child Left Behind Act’s two downsides
affect American students in a number of ways. Not only are these children deprived of arts,
music, and physical education, but they are not learning as much. Teachers were told under the No Child Left
Behind Act to teach to the test. Therefore, teachers are not focusing on the
hidden curriculum or concepts that the teacher thinks are important because they are not
found on these standardized tests. The No Child Left Behind Act did not help
the education levels of the United States. Luckily, President Barack Obama signed a new
law on December 10, 2015 called the Every Student Succeeds Act. The ESSA will hopefully put the United States
back on track to provide quality education to all students. All of the information from this slide came
from George Bush’s act he wrote in 2001 and from an article written by Jack Jennings
and Diane Stark Rentner called Ten Big Effects of the No Child Left Behind Act on Public
Schools.” The second issue is Socioeconomic Status. “The differences resulting from low or high
socioeconomic statuses affect all students. At home, children with a high socioeconomic
status may feel more fortunate because of their big houses and wealth, but studies show
that these children face more drug abuse and emotional issues such as depression. However, children in low socioeconomic statuses
can not only afford healthcare, but they sometimes cannot afford rent or food. A major difference between the two statuses
is the parenting styles. High socioeconomic families hold parenting
styles such as authoritarian or permissive, because they have less authority over their
children and use fewer forms of physical punishment. Low socioeconomic families hold parenting
styles such as authoritarian because of the amount of authority parents hold over their
children and the high amounts of physical punishments they use. Students home lives from both extremes of
socioeconomic statuses affect their lives at school. However, the schools themselves are different
too. Schools with a low socioeconomic statuses
tend to have fewer resources, lower test scores, and lower graduation rates while schools with
high socioeconomic statuses experience the opposites. These students are provided extremely different
qualities of education, simply because of their socioeconomic statuses. All of the information from this slide came
from our textbook called Adolescence by John Santrock and from an article written by Philip
Hallinger and Joseph F. Murphy called The Social Context of Effective Schools.” The third issue is mental health. Mental health in adolescence has been linked
to dropout rates. Poor mental health has been found common within
adolescents. In a study performed by the Public Health
and Epidemiology Group, Department of Health Science and Technology at Aalborg University,
1524 participants were chosen for their risk of dropping out. 753 of those participants were in poor mental
health. One in five of these participants was found
in poor mental health, with the most prevalence among those who left school at an earlier
educational level. One third of students who did drop out in
this study had declining mental health. In this study it was also found that females
were 83% more likely to report the status of their declining mental health than males
were. In the year 2015 three million adolescents
had reported having one major depressive episode at least once that year. In a study performed around Montreal, 12 disadvantage
high schools surveyed their students before the year began about their mental health,
as well as background factors that may affect their results, which was followed up by an
interview a year later. The results found that of the 183 adolescents
that dropped out, a quarter of them had significant depression in the months leading to their
departure from the school. “School dropout portends other bad outcomes,
like the inability to gain employment, involvement in substance abuse and problems with the juvenile
justice system,” said Dr. Laura Mufson of Columbia University Medical Center in New
York City. All information within this slide came from
Mental health and school dropout across educational levels and genders: a 4.8-year follow-up study
performed by Cathrine F. Line Bilgrav, Louise Sjørslev Frandsen, Charlotte Overgaard, Christian
Torp-Pedersen,Berit Nielsen,and Henrik Bøggild, as well as the article Depression in late
teens linked to high school drop out by Cheryl Platzman Weinstock. The fourth issue is risk taking. Adolescence is a time for increased risk-taking
and sensation seeking. Certain places where people do not get along
vs places where people do get along well are factors that may induce or decrease risk taking. Hallways, bathrooms, playgrounds, parking
lots, stairwells and cafeterias are seen as unsafe places where a student may partake
in risk. For example, 40% of students reported negative
social interaction in the stairwells and only 15% reported positive interactions. These places have little to no supervision. These unsupervised areas lead to students
making poor decisions and taking risks during the school day. All information in this slide comes from What
Parents Should Know about Adolescent Development: The Influence of Schools on Adolescent Behavior
and Risk Taking by Stephanie M Jones. The last question is, what could more research
do? Although there is already a ton of research
done on this specific topic, there are always benefits that will come out of research. More research in this specific topic could
lead to helping teachers find ways to help out their students during these tough times,
decrease the significant amount of bullying that occurs during adolescence, lead to more
specific ways to decrease the prevalence of depression, prevent dropping out of school
early, and an overall positive change in school culture for adolescents. Lastly we have a google form, that includes
a quiz over our powerpoint to see how much you learned, so you can go ahead and take
that and see what you had learned. And, we have an answer key right here, and
this is our reference page. Thanks so much!