Rookie Report: Remote Schooling – Behind the News

Rookie Report: Remote Schooling – Behind the News

September 13, 2019 1 By Ronny Jaskolski


GIRL: This is our home, our school, our business and our community. We live 220 kilometres north-west of Longreach, in Outback Queensland. BOY: My morning routine is
we wake up at six o’clock, have breakfast, we let out the dogs,
we check the horses and our chookies, then we go over at 7:30
and start school. ALL: Welcome to
the Orielton Schoolhouse. Good morning, you three.
This is Miss Single here. School of the Air is
living miles and miles apart from the teachers and local school… ..and corresponding to them
on the telephone and computer. At a mainstream school, you would normally move rooms
or have a new teacher. No offence, Mum. But for us, we rearrange our desks
and change posters sometimes. This year, specially, we get to paint the walls
and have a little bit more fun. What I like about school is,
when it’s a sick day, I can wear my pyjamas to school. And it only takes 10 seconds
to get back to the house. Hello, everybody. This is my desk
and my school equipment here. Up here is the timetable that
tells us when all our lessons are on, and what number they are. I have maths from 8:30 to 9:30. I have English from 11 o’clock
to 12 o’clock. So, have a read and think about
what we’re going to be doing today. I thought I might give you a tour
of the reading room. Over here, we have all our books
and games and reading materials. We come here for quiet time. And over here, we have materials
to make things for science. Who can tell me where
I’m going to find the answer? Do you think I’m going
to find it in the text? Sometimes,
it’s a little bit difficult to hear what your teacher’s saying
when on air because they’re so far away. What I find difficult
about School of the Air is that we have internet issues
out here. So, the collaborator
usually drops out a lot and that can really disrupt
your lessons. Can you use your pointer to show me? Great job. One thing people might not know
about distance ed is that we never miss
a day of school, even if we’re sick, we travel, etc. We also make up for it
during the weekends and sometimes even holidays. We also go to swimming carnivals
and athletics at Longreach, which is 220 kilometres away
from here on a dirt road. I think it’s better
doing school at home because you get to see
all your family instead of going
all the way to Longreach. But it would be pretty cool to hop on a bus somewhere
in uniform. Well, this week,
I will be packing up and getting ready
for a 700-kilometre drive up to Townsville, starting boarding school
at Townsville Grammar. Done and dusted.
Ready for boarding school 2017. I’ll be getting to
a mainstream school, which will be very exciting, and I’ll be getting lessons
five days a week. Also I’ll be wearing
a uniform every day. I think what I will miss most
while I’m at boarding school is my family, the animals, and the thousands of acres
that we can get lost in. I’m pretty lucky because,
when you do school at home, you do get pretty distracted
out the window. There are loaders,
trucks, motorbikes, and I really wish I was out there. Farewell from Elke, Livie and Riley
and Flat Stanley. And from our outback
Orielton schoolroom. Thanks, guys.