Qualify for Scholarships–Submit your Scholarship Statement

Qualify for Scholarships–Submit your Scholarship Statement

September 15, 2019 0 By Ronny Jaskolski


The top things you want to remember
about the personal statement: one, paying attention to deadlines is critical. Two,
have somebody look it over. You don’t want to just submit the first thing that
comes to your mind. And three–I forgot what three was. To keep it simple, there’s
scholarships that you can’t receive unless you complete the personal
statement. So if you don’t fill it out you’re essentially leaving money on the
table. We know that you’re bigger than a test score or a GPA, and the personal
statement really allows you to expand upon who you are as a person, what you’ve
accomplished and what you can really contribute to the university. You should
fill out the personal statement because do you have nothing to lose.
A few hours of my life that I took out is going to impact me for the rest of my
life. That’s a chance that you should be willing to take. We’re not looking for a
list of every single activity or service project–we are looking for a story. 500
words is like, enough space so that you can thoroughly represent something. Talk
about one specific event. I promise you, there is, there’s something unique about
you. Like it might be something that you think is so minor, focus in on that one
singular experience and you realize how major it actually really is. And
everyone’s different, not everyone has the luxury of just focusing on school.
Maybe you’re working part-time, helping family at home. Maybe you have younger
siblings to take care of. Take what you’ve had to do in these in these
circumstances and say, because of this experience I’m now better positioned to
excel at school. Pick your topic, and be specific. Specicifity. Specificity. Specificity. I think often the expectation we have of
ourselves is that we would like sit down, in ten minutes we’ll be able to type out
the perfect personal statement–that’s not how writing works. Not for anybody!
Get out a piece of paper, or a laptop and just write everything that’s in your
mind about that topic. Even if it seems like garbage at the time and that it
doesn’t make sense and it’s not cohesive, if it doesn’t matter–like get it all
onto the page. Take about a day away from it, maybe two days, and then come back and
read it over. And oftentimes what you’ll find is that there’s some good stuff in
there. That’s how you start. Have someone look at it.
Ask a friend or your teacher like, is this representing me in a really clear
and truthful way? We’re not looking at grammar, we’re more looking for context,
but it is important to show that you know how to write and you can articulate
your thoughts. Work on a good opening sentence. Proofread it. And send it off.
Don’t be too nervous because we just want to know who you are. It’s a chance
to earn more money to go to Nebraska. We want to bring in students who have
different perspectives and experiences to make this a great University. I’m just like nervous, I’ve never done
anything like this before! I think that’s cool that this kid can lick his elbow,
but unfortunately it doesn’t provide a lot of context or other information that
would allow me to give you scholarship money or support through a program that
would help you be successful.