NAISDA Dance College

NAISDA Dance College

September 15, 2019 0 By Ronny Jaskolski


We have three levels at present that
we’re training. We have a certificate III, IV and diploma.
We have contemporary dance, we have contemporary Indigenous dance, we have
ballet of course. Then we’ve got music, we’ve got music composition, we’ve also
got a new course called dance film which is really exciting because they learn to
how to make dance films and use dance as a medium to make films. As Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people our way of knowing the world giving meaning to everything in it comes through dance, music, the visual arts. So I’m really committed to seeing that NAISDA is a college that thrives into the future and
continues to produce amazing graduates who go on to have careers all around the
world. I don’t have a performing bone in my body but my role on the board isn’t to perform I guess it’s to make sure that we’re strategically
developing the organisation and sustaining it for the future. I see value
in giving our next generation you know a foundation of culture, dance, song,
language. Dancing it’s my voice. Instead of talking it’s a way for me to connect to what I’m saying, connect to my history in my past and connect to the future. NAISDA has basically given me my culture back – that would be the main thing that’s the main reason why I came here and I got that and so much more. I know a lot of other dance schools they don’t have the cultural connection that NAISDA has. One of the reasons I chose NAISDA was because it wasn’t just about dancing
it’s about telling the stories and moving forward. Dance is just a different
way to express. For me definitely watching dance it’s very very powerful
and it really just shoots forward and hits you right where it needs to hit you. The thing I love about NAISDA is its a place where people can come who have disengaged with education for whatever reason but have an artistic bent and talent in that direction come and they can hone those skills to be able to move
forward and have a career. Some will go down the professional dance path and end up as professional dancers with the likes of Bangarra. Others will go down independent dance room and become their own independent dance artist. Others will go
into the cultural dance stream and use cultural dance as their form of teaching
and communicating. NAISDA wouldn’t survive without
Government support. One of the beautiful things about NAISDA is that we don’t
charge fees. We’ve got our young people coming from very different socioeconomic
backgrounds and to have a safe and open space for them to be able to come and train and not have to pay fees is really important for us. That support that a
Government can give is critical not only to the college but to the identity of
the nation.