How To Teach Your Dog To Ignore Other Dogs – Professional Dog Training Tips

How To Teach Your Dog To Ignore Other Dogs – Professional Dog Training Tips

October 22, 2019 9 By Ronny Jaskolski


In our last video, we taught you how to teach your dog to
ignore distractions and used to “leave it” command. But what we heard from you is that one
of your toughest distractions is other dogs. And you can see a little
final behind me is no exception. In today’s video, we’re going to teach you how to teach
your dog to ignore distractions. I’m Ken Steepe, I’m Steve Walsh,
and this is happy go lucky. Final, welcome back to McCann Dogs. A couple of weeks ago we posted a video
on how to teach your dog to leave it and ignore distractions around
them. This video today, we’re going to build on that and
take that distraction outside. So if you haven’t seen that video, click
that Link down there and have a look. So once your dog has an
understanding of how to leave things, and we’ve talked about those
static distractions in the house, it’s time to go outside and really
start to test this in real life. Now, like anything else, it’s my job
to help my dog be successful. I’ve done the foundation work and taught
him what leave it means in certain situations. But out here now I need to be really
conscious of how close I’m getting notice as distractions to help him
make those same great choices. Now when you come out in
the real world, of course, distractions can come from anywhere. It’s pretty hard to
control some of the things, but one of the things that we can really
control as our distance from them, one of the biggest distractions
for most dogs is other dogs. And most of our dogs say, Oh my gosh, there’s a friend I should go run and play
with that dog. I will tell you that a, that’s one of the first things
that I teach my dog to leave. Now when I do that I want to again, make sure that I’m setting
my dog up for success. I’m not going to walk up to another dog
and expect my young dog to be able to leave that right away. But let’s say the moment my dog
looks at a dog across the park, that’s when I might start to get my little
food out, get them ready, tell them, leave it. Use a little food and their
nose. Turn and move them away and yes, and reward and build on
that success at a distance. Once I have a little bit of success, they’re moving closer is
going to help test that. So I’m out here outside
now and of course finals, looking around and he sees something
over in the distance. So just to review, I’ve got some food in my hand ready to
go in the moment. His eyes go there, I’m going to say leave it. I’m immediately going to put the food to
his nose and I’m going to turn and move 180 degrees away.
Rewarding him as he goes. So I’m going to wait until he looks
here. Leave it. Yes. Good boy. Very good job. So I said, leave
it. I use that food to turn him. I marked it with my yes, and then I
rewarded him as he moved with me. Now, one of the best ways to teach your dog
to ignore distractions is by controlling the distance from them and having a
little leash free park or someplace where you can work as a really,
really great tool to use. I don’t recommend that you walk into
Elise free park and expect to be able to teach your dog to leave it, but
being outside a park like this, and we’re going to put some dogs in
here and a little bit and make things exciting for a little final, but
moving, I’m teaching him this, leave it at a distance where I can move
further away to help him be successful and then start to move closer
as he gets more successful, can really help solidify his understanding
no matter that distraction around him. I’m going to let final look into
this imaginary little lease free park that we’ve created here and I’m going to
review those steps that we already have taught him. Okay. He’s going to look, I’m going to say leave it food
and his notes. Yes. Good boy. Excellent job and I might move a little
closer. He’s going to look at that. Good boy. Now, one of the things
you’ll notice is happening. I spend a lot of time doing
the foundation work so he is, it’s already becoming harder for him
to get distracted in this environment. This may seem like something
that’s really basic for this dog. I’ve done this a number of times with him, but I can’t tell you how important
it is to keep practicing every little repetition. Successful repetition of leave it is
helping to build as understanding two or three times isn’t going to cut it. I need to keep doing it and keep
doing it before I start to add more distractions. You can see with some dogs running around
here that that final has definitely a little bit more interested
in this kind of stimulation. Now I’m feeling pretty
confident in his validation, so I’m going to try and work this,
leave it here. Same rules will apply. He’s looking, I’m going to say
leave it food and his nose. Oh, it’s not working cause we,
we’re a little too close now. This is a pretty common thing. I’ve said
leave it. I put some food on his nose. He says, not happening. Okay, here’s
what I need to do to help him. I need to move a little bit further away
to help him understand how to respond. Even though I’ve done some
great foundation on this,
he thinks this is really, really important, so we’re just going to shift back
a little bit and try it again. I’ve moved about a, I don’t know, 15 feet away from that initial position
and I’m going to try and see if we can do this again. The dogs are in the
corner. He’s looking. Good boy. Leave it. Yes. Good boy. Excellent. Good job. What a good puppy dog and I’m actually
going to give you a little jackpot reward for that because this is a pretty hard
distraction. I’m going to try it again. Leave it. Yes. Good boy.
Excellent. Good job. Now I’m going to move a little
quicker than I really suggest. I’m confident that he can start
to work a little bit closer, but my version of closer
is two or three feet. It’s not 10 feet to have him make a
mistake again. Okay. Now he’s looking, leave it. Yes. Good boy. Little
bit closer. Leave it. Yes. Good boy. Excellent job. Very nice.
And maybe one step closer again. Leave it. Yes. Good boy. Excellent. You’ll notice I’m building in little
steps to help him be right over and over and over again. Finals
had some really good, successful repetitions of understanding. Leave it with a little bit of food lure.
So I’m gonna give him a little test, just like in that video we did a
couple of weeks ago. I’m going to say, leave it and see what happens. Now
if he responds, I’m going to say yes, move away and throw a party.
If he doesn’t, no big deal.
I’m gonna repeat that. Leave it out. A few bumps in the
leash and encourage him to move away. And and really still still let
them know he’s doing a great job, but it’s important that I go back and
change that distance to help them be successful. So I’m gonna see what happens
here. He’s looking in that direction. Leave it. Yes. Good boy. Excellent
job. When I get puppy dog, I can even pull out a little toy, have a little tug in play and let them
know that it’s absolutely the right thing to do. Good boy. Good job going out. Now I’m gonna move a little closer and
see if we can just kind of push his understanding a little bit here.
Okay. Now I’m going to move the met. Yes, go ahead boy. Excellent. I will
tell you, I’m pretty surprised by that. Given his interest in these other dogs, for him to respond that
quickly is something I really
want to start to celebrate with him. Okay. Now I’m gonna try and move a little closer
or we’re just gonna keep pushing and see how, where his little threshold is
for this. So we’ll go a little closer. Leave it. Yes. Good boy. Excellent.
Good job. Very nice. Good. Let’s go back. Let’s go. Leave it. Yes. Good boy. Her Ray. Excellent job. We’ll
try one more, a little closer here. Leave it, leave it. Hi
guy. I did catch you. Yes. Now, I will say I went
way too close there, but I really wanted you
to see the immediacy of
microfinance. I said, leave it. He didn’t respond. I’m not
mad at him. I simply repeated, leave it out of those pulses away.
Now I helped me successful again. So here are the important things to
remember when you’re teaching your dog to leave it and ignore moving
distractions like these dogs. Keep your distance away from them. The further you are away and the
more successful your dog can be, the easier it becomes
for them to understand. The more mistakes they make
by getting too close too soon, the harder it is for them to
understand. So start farther away, move close to help them understand
how to be right, and then test them. And if they’re still struggling,
just move a little bit further away. There’s nothing wrong
with moving further away, to build on their successes and then
start to push their ability to understand. Like most dogs, dogs are probably
your dog’s biggest distraction. But it’s important you’ve worked this
scenario through all distractions, whether it be bikes or cars
or that squirrel that keeps
taunting you on the back deck. Find all sorts of different things to
help proof your dog’s understanding of how to leave it and ignore distractions. Now you’ve made it this far through
this video and you haven’t gone back to watch our first video with leaving
it. Click that card right there. If this is your first time on the
channel and you haven’t subscribed yet, click that subscribe button. On
that note, I’m Steve. Happy trading.