How to Survive College as a First Generation Hispanic College Student – Latinos in College

November 20, 2019 0 By Ronny Jaskolski


My parents only went to sixth grade, but so
far I’ve learned a lot about myself and I really enjoy college. In College, I’m a senior and sociology major.
First generation Hispanic college students. I have tips here on how to be successful in
college. First of all, always plan. Have a planner at all times. Stay fit. Go to the
gym. Workout. It’s easy to gain weight in college. And just try and stay active with
intramural sports. Come in with an open mind. I started off thinking
I wanted to do sociology. I was taking classes in sociology and then in chemistry, and I
realized that I was enjoying my chemistry classes more than my sociology classes. So
that’s how I decided I wanted to be a biochemistry major. Tips on how to choose a major while you’re
in college is, I think, just choosing something that is your passion, because you’re going
to do this for a long time and it’s your career. And you have to choose your major, something
that you love to do. Experiment. First-year students, go out. Take
classes in accounting, science, social sciences, and experiment and see what you like. Find
your passion. Let’s say your mom doesn’t want you to do,
or your parents, this major because you have a bunch of student loans, like I do. What
my advice is: it’s what I’m doing. This is my life. You know? We’re adults now. We can
choose what career, where we want to go, what we want to study, and it’s part of growing
up. What I like to think is find something I would
do for free and get paid for it. As a first-generation Hispanic college student,
the difference between living at home and not living at home, for me, has been – I mean
coming here to College, I have saved a lot of money. So, though I might not get the experience
of living in the dorms and everything like that, even though I might live at home, I
make sure that I’m here at school. I’ve become involved with different activities. I get
to know people. I outreach. Get to go to the games or become part of the clubs. And I think
that’s a major thing. Like even if you’re living off campus, outreaching and just being
involved in your school is a good way to not feel like you’re left out. My experience as a Hispanic first-generation
college student not living on campus and not living with my parents has been very interesting.
I feel like I’m very independent, yet when I go home, I have to abide by their rules,
and I do not like that because I’ve learned to be an independent person here at college.
I’m not afraid to tell my parents that I’m an adult now and that they should respect
me just like I respect them. They get pretty upset sometimes, but we work it out eventually. As a first-year generation Hispanic college
student, the advantages of staying on campus versus not staying on campus are you’re just
really close to your classes, or I mean you can always go back to your dorm if you forget
anything. You really get a chance to adjust to the lifestyle
of a college student. Prior to coming to college, I had a very different perception of what
college was. So, living here and kind of seeing what the other students do and what their
life is like has really made me a better person, I feel. You grow up. You’re more on your own
schedule. You have to go to class on your own. You don’t have your mother to wake you
up in the morning anymore. Hispanic, you usually stay at home until you’re
married. And for me to leave the house was a big no-no for them, but they’re used to
it now. And my sister is also in college, so it was easier when she moved out. And it’s mostly just like you feel like an
adult now. You’re in the real world. You become more mature. You become more reliable
for your own decisions. Just moving out, I mean that was a big shock
for me. When I go back home, it’s really different now. I mean I feel like I’m just a guest at
my house. I mean I don’t have my own room anymore. You really have to rely on yourself, and I
think that’s great. Other cool things is you really have a lot of resources on campus.
At home I don’t really have a chance to, you know, pay for a gym membership or have a basketball
court available to me whenever, or have a giant TV room out just on campus or coffee
shop, or things like that. So it’s really neat to have everything nearby and so flexible.
You know, a library to go and study, so you don’t have your brothers and sisters yelling
next to you while you’re trying to do homework at home. So, it’s definitely neat. Just as lost and confused as everybody else.
And I wanted to cry and go home, but I didn’t. Neat, but there’s also a lot of disadvantages,
like I miss my family a lot. I miss my home life. It’s just like, you know, some of the
other people said. It’s part of growing up, so it’s definitely neat. Because my sister took over the room, and
so I feel like when I go home, I don’t have my own place or my own bed or anything. And
I feel like I have to go by my parent’s rules when over here, at Lynnfield, I do what I
want. I go out whenever I want. And it’s just really different. I just feel, you know, it’s
kind of sad, but it’s part of growing up. Manage your time well. Don’t get involved
with too many things. Sometimes that is just overwhelming. Instead of doing six diff¬¬erent
things, or clubs and activities, do two and be dedicated to those fully. Get involved because that’s the way to meet
people. And if you are a loner, you’re not going to survive. Junior year. Senior year. This whole concept
of college arises and you don’t know how to pay for it. First off all, fill out your FAFSA.
Get your free application for Financial Aid as soon as it begins. It is first come, first
served. So, if you do it late in the year, you might not get as much benefit as you do
otherwise. Go to the college career center in your high
school or go talk to your counselor. A lot of times they’ll have scholarships or will
actually help you find scholarships specific. So, maybe if you’re a first-year generation
college student, there are scholarships for that. Make sure you check all scholarships in your
state, at a national level, international level. There are scholarships out there for
everyone, especially for first-generation Latinos. But if you’re undocumented, it is not the
end of the world. Yes, you cannot apply for the FAFSA application, but there are other
sources. There are scholarships out there for undocumented students. There are sponsors.
You just have got to look and want to get an education. Reach out to your local government. Sometimes
the community will offer tons of scholarships. Sometimes they’re just first-year scholarships,
but either way anything helps when you’re going to college, and then some of the bigger
ones. You know, the Gates Scholarships. If you’re in the state of Oregon or Washington,
or California, check the Ford Scholarship. My parents only went to sixth grade, but so
far I’ve learned a lot about myself and I really enjoy college. In College, I’m a senior and sociology major.
First generation Hispanic college students. I have tips here on how to be successful in
college. First of all, always plan. Have a planner at all times. Stay fit. Go to the
gym. Workout. It’s easy to gain weight in college. And just try and stay active with
intramural sports. Come in with an open mind. I started off thinking
I wanted to do sociology. I was taking classes in sociology and then in chemistry, and I
realized that I was enjoying my chemistry classes more than my sociology classes. So
that’s how I decided I wanted to be a biochemistry major. Tips on how to choose a major while you’re
in college is, I think, just choosing something that is your passion, because you’re going
to do this for a long time and it’s your career. And you have to choose your major, something
that you love to do. Experiment. First-year students, go out. Take
classes in accounting, science, social sciences, and experiment and see what you like. Find
your passion. Let’s say your mom doesn’t want you to do,
or your parents, this major because you have a bunch of student loans, like I do. What
my advice is: it’s what I’m doing. This is my life. You know? We’re adults now. We can
choose what career, where we want to go, what we want to study, and it’s part of growing
up. What I like to think is find something I would
do for free and get paid for it. As a first-generation Hispanic college student,
the difference between living at home and not living at home, for me, has been – I mean
coming here to College, I have saved a lot of money. So, though I might not get the experience
of living in the dorms and everything like that, even though I might live at home, I
make sure that I’m here at school. I’ve become involved with different activities. I get
to know people. I outreach. Get to go to the games or become part of the clubs. And I think
that’s a major thing. Like even if you’re living off campus, outreaching and just being
involved in your school is a good way to not feel like you’re left out. My experience as a Hispanic first-generation
college student not living on campus and not living with my parents has been very interesting.
I feel like I’m very independent, yet when I go home, I have to abide by their rules,
and I do not like that because I’ve learned to be an independent person here at college.
I’m not afraid to tell my parents that I’m an adult now and that they should respect
me just like I respect them. They get pretty upset sometimes, but we work it out eventually. As a first-year generation Hispanic college
student, the advantages of staying on campus versus not staying on campus are you’re just
really close to your classes, or I mean you can always go back to your dorm if you forget
anything. You really get a chance to adjust to the lifestyle
of a college student. Prior to coming to college, I had a very different perception of what
college was. So, living here and kind of seeing what the other students do and what their
life is like has really made me a better person, I feel. You grow up. You’re more on your own
schedule. You have to go to class on your own. You don’t have your mother to wake you
up in the morning anymore. Hispanic, you usually stay at home until you’re
married. And for me to leave the house was a big no-no for them, but they’re used to
it now. And my sister is also in college, so it was easier when she moved out. And it’s mostly just like you feel like an
adult now. You’re in the real world. You become more mature. You become more reliable
for your own decisions. Just moving out, I mean that was a big shock
for me. When I go back home, it’s really different now. I mean I feel like I’m just a guest at
my house. I mean I don’t have my own room anymore. You really have to rely on yourself, and I
think that’s great. Other cool things is you really have a lot of resources on campus.
At home I don’t really have a chance to, you know, pay for a gym membership or have a basketball
court available to me whenever, or have a giant TV room out just on campus or coffee
shop, or things like that. So it’s really neat to have everything nearby and so flexible.
You know, a library to go and study, so you don’t have your brothers and sisters yelling
next to you while you’re trying to do homework at home. So, it’s definitely neat. Just as lost and confused as everybody else.
And I wanted to cry and go home, but I didn’t. Neat, but there’s also a lot of disadvantages,
like I miss my family a lot. I miss my home life. It’s just like, you know, some of the
other people said. It’s part of growing up, so it’s definitely neat. Because my sister took over the room, and
so I feel like when I go home, I don’t have my own place or my own bed or anything. And
I feel like I have to go by my parent’s rules when over here, at Lynnfield, I do what I
want. I go out whenever I want. And it’s just really different. I just feel, you know, it’s
kind of sad, but it’s part of growing up. Manage your time well. Don’t get involved
with too many things. Sometimes that is just overwhelming. Instead of doing six diff¬¬erent
things, or clubs and activities, do two and be dedicated to those fully. Get involved because that’s the way to meet
people. And if you are a loner, you’re not going to survive. Junior year. Senior year. This whole concept
of college arises and you don’t know how to pay for it. First off all, fill out your FAFSA.
Get your free application for Financial Aid as soon as it begins. It is first come, first
served. So, if you do it late in the year, you might not get as much benefit as you do
otherwise. Go to the college career center in your high
school or go talk to your counselor. A lot of times they’ll have scholarships or will
actually help you find scholarships specific. So, maybe if you’re a first-year generation
college student, there are scholarships for that. Make sure you check all scholarships in your
state, at a national level, international level. There are scholarships out there for
everyone, especially for first-generation Latinos. But if you’re undocumented, it is not the
end of the world. Yes, you cannot apply for the FAFSA application, but there are other
sources. There are scholarships out there for undocumented students. There are sponsors.
You just have got to look and want to get an education. Reach out to your local government. Sometimes
the community will offer tons of scholarships. Sometimes they’re just first-year scholarships,
but either way anything helps when you’re going to college, and then some of the bigger
ones. You know, the Gates Scholarships. If you’re in the state of Oregon or Washington,
or California, check the Ford Scholarship.