How To Get a 4.0 GPA in High School | 5 Simple Tips (EASY)

How To Get a 4.0 GPA in High School | 5 Simple Tips (EASY)

March 10, 2020 100 By Ronny Jaskolski


Hi, this is GmanLyfe, and you’re watching
5 simple tricks I used to get a 4.0 GPA in high school. So let me preface this video by saying that
I, as the title may suggest, am a high school senior who has earned a 4.0 GPA throughout
high school. Now, I’m not saying this to brag, or show
how smart I am. Actually, I’m doing the opposite. I don’t really think that I’m personally that
inherently smart, but I implemented these five tips and also worked really hard throughout
high school to earn all A’s in honors/AP classes since freshman year. Honestly, I’m pretty sure that almost everyone
can do it too. So, without further ado, let’s get into tip
#1. Tip #1: Get into as many AP & Honors classes
as you can. Basically every high school in the United
States offers honors classes, or AP classes, or both. Taking these classes is a great way to boost
up your GPA. Now you may be thinking that taking all honors
and AP classes is going to be way too much work, and that you might not get all A’s if
you take all honors and APs. That may be true, but because AP and honors
classes are weighted differently GPA wise, a B in an honors class is pretty much the
same as an A in a non-honors class, GPA wise. Also, from a college admissions standpoint,
they want to see that you are taking the hardest classes that you can, and challenging yourself,
so getting the B in the honors class is a lot better than getting the A in the regular
class. Now, the next few tips will allow you to actually
tackle those harder classes. Tip #2: Ask questions during and after class. This may actually be the most valuable piece
of information in this video. It is crucial that you make sure that every
teacher is on YOUR side. What do I mean by that? Don’t ever forget that teachers are human,
just like the rest of us, and so, it’s inevitable that they are going to have some favorites
and some kids that they don’t like that much. Now I’m not telling you to kiss up to the
teacher or act like a teacher’s pet, because most of the time that actually works against
you. But, if you show that you are interested in
the material that the teacher is teaching, it makes the teacher feel good about themselves
and makes them feel like they’re doing good to the world, and that you’re actually someone
that they want to see succeed. When that teacher is grading your test, for
example, they’ll assume that you worked really hard on it, and studied a lot, and they might
cut you some extra slack. I would make it a goal to ask at least two
relevant questions, per class, per day. Then, once a week in each class, or once every
two weeks, go up to the teacher after class and ask some sort of “further thinking” question. In a foreign language class, you could ask
for a teacher’s opinion on a certain TV show in that language, or a certain artist who
sings in that language. In a math class, you could ask for the proof
of a theorem that was discussed in class and ask the teacher to walk you through it. Your teachers will begin to like you a whole
lot more if you start doing this, which can help you not only for grades, but also for
teacher recommendations, which you’re going to need if you’re applying to college. Tip #3: Do your homework. This may seem really simple, but a lot of
the “smart” kids tend to feel too good to do the daily homework. Maybe you already understand the material
and you don’t feel like doing mundane practice problems, but in a lot of classes, your homework
grade is 10-15%, and if that’s not at 100, you’re missing out on a huge chance to boost
your grade. Especially in AP classes where teachers move
very fast through the material, you’re going to want to make sure that you’re doing all
of the homework so you can stay caught up, and also so if you flunk a few tests you’ll
have that “cushion,” which is your homework grade. Tip #4: Concepts first, details later. This tip is primarily for when you’re studying
for a test. When you’re studying for a physics test, say,
don’t just study the formula sheet, and try to memorize every single formula. First, you have to understand WHY each formula
exists, what the different elements of each formula are, and what it can help you solve
in real life problems. In AP Euro, for example, before memorizing
the list of crops that was brought from the Americas to Europe during the Columbian Exchange,
understand why Europeans funded mass exploration during this time period, and why they ended
up dominating the Native Americans. Khan Academy, LitCharts, and Crash Course
are all great free online resources that really help you to grasp the concepts of something,
and once you’ve studied those, you can go into your notes and learn the little details
of each lesson. You’ll probably find that it’s actually much
easier to memorize the details once you understand the big picture. Tip #5: Never give up. I’m a total believer in the notion that succeeding
in high school is about 90% hard work and only 10% talent, intelligence, whatever you
want to call it. That said, no matter how hard you work, there’s
always going to be some tests that you fail, some papers that you bomb, things like that. You might feel like switching out of a class,
especially if it’s the first test and you’ve already done poorly on it, but if you think
about it, one test in the grand scheme of things does not have a huge effect on your
grade, especially if you can get on the teacher’s good side later and work to ameliorate that
mistake. Also, dropping out of an AP one month into
classes will really look worse to colleges than simply getting a B in the class. So let’s say that you just failed your first
test in AP Physics. Now, assuming that you’ve followed tip #2,
you’re already asking questions to your teacher, your teacher already knows that you’re there
to learn, and you are interested in physics. Now because you’ve built up the image in your
teacher’s mind that you are someone that wants to succeed, they will be more than happy to
go over the test answers with you, and possibly even give you some points back. Also, after you’ve met with a teacher, you
can always ask if there are any extra credit opportunities that you can pursue to make
up for some of the lost points on the test. If you’re a good-natured kid, and your teacher
sees that you’re really trying to succeed in the class, they might actually take you
up on it! And there you have it! Now, these tips are very easy to understand,
but the difficult part is actually putting in the work to implement them. There are going to be days where you feel
just too tired or too bored or too distracted to ask relevant questions during class. But, it’s the small things that add up, and
end up making a big difference. I will be posting a new video every Monday,
so if you found this helpful, please hit that subscribe button so you don’t miss next Monday’s
video. I will be posting mainly about college admissions,
education, high school, things like that. This is GmanLyfe, and I will see you next
week!