How I won scholarships

How I won scholarships

September 11, 2019 2 By Ronny Jaskolski


[Music] Hi, I’m Estefania, and I graduated class of
2018 from UC Berkeley. Hello I’m Jonasha. I’m class of 2020, and I attend North Carolina
A&T State University. I’m Eric. I graduated in 2018 and I went to the George
Washington University. I think I applied my freshman year to, I applied
to maybe 10 scholarships and I got six of them. Honestly I probably applied for 75 scholarships,
and I have been awarded probably 30 or more of those scholarships. I would say in the end I won about 10 to 15
different scholarships, um, and collected about $200,000 to $300,000 for college. [Music] When I was applying to scholarships, I had
made a college resume of all the extracurriculars that I had done, different sports and academic
achievements that I had been awarded, and that really helped lay out things in a structured
form that could easily let me transfer it from one scholarship application to another. When I was in high school I used just a spreadsheet
to keep track of everything I applied for. But not only what I applied for, but different
steps, right? So when I’d send my teacher recommendation,
I would put a check. When I finished my essays, I’d put a check. I think keeping track of where you are and
also knowing your deadlines, is a really great way to make sure you’re applying not only
to as many scholarships as you can but as efficiently as possible. I have a planner that I put my entire life
in, so whenever there’s a due date, I always just look at my planner to know when the scholarship
is due and when that deadline is. [Music] My tips for completing scholarship essays
will always be to read the instructions for them. So, a lot of scholarships have a minimum word
count or either a maximum word count. So you always need to be mindful of that. I think one thing that people overlook is
acceptance rate for scholarships are super deflated. And what I mean by that, is there’s actually
a great number of candidates who apply with too long of a word count of an essay, who
apply and miss their teacher recommendation, or forget one component. Another recommendation I would have is to
look on their website and see if there are any previous scholarship winners that have
been announced there, and consider reaching out to them. Ask them what the application process was
like, what they think helped them throughout the process, because odds are these students
would love to share their experience with you and um, give you some advice on scholarship
applications. [Music] My biggest advice would be not to get discouraged. You’re going to get as many rejections as
you do acceptances, probably even more rejections, and that’s fine. Sometimes it’s a numbers game. Keep applying. Stay proactive. And make sure that you’re putting yourself
out there. Just because you don’t get one scholarship
doesn’t mean that you’re not gonna get the next one. You just have to keep trying. And that’s another thing with life. You can’t just give up because one thing didn’t
work out. You always have to keep going, because at
the end of the day, as long as you try your best and you’re getting 1% better, that’s
all that matters. [Music]