Home Schooling in America: Military Family Finds Stability in Learning at Home

Home Schooling in America: Military Family Finds Stability in Learning at Home

September 6, 2019 1 By Ronny Jaskolski


– [Child] Daddy!Daddy! – Daddy. – This one’s me! – This one’s Hawkins. – [Ruby] That’s what I am. – [Lindsay] Aw. That’s what you are? That’s the sad face for Ruby. – [Clifford] Aw, don’t be sad. I’ll be home soon. – My husband’s name is Clifford, and he is currently deployed to Iraq. – Wow! Is that made out of Legos? – Yeah. – This is his third Iraq deployment and once to Afghanistan, one
year long to Afghanistan. – Good job, bud. – And the bottom folds up like this. – [Lindsay] My husband and I got married. We were both active-duty
service members in the Army, and we had just returned
from a deployment to Iraq. – [Clifford] Love you. – Love you.Say bye? – Bye, Daddy! – I think one of our biggest
challenges is the moving. Being displaced from your normal, being displaced from your home can be a challenge. We have a ten year old, a seven year old, a five year old, a three year old, and a one year old. [baby Mumbles] – [Lindsay] We first started
thinking about homeschooling before my oldest was in school. I have so many friends that
have their kids in public school and they do really well. But in my mind, I just couldn’t see putting him in a school and
then taking him right back out. We decided that homeschooling
was a good choice for freedom, I mean, we can make our own schedule. We can get in the same amount of days as a public school would get, but we can do it when we want. When my husband comes
home from deployment, we can take off a really big break. So other than the schedule and choosing our own curriculum, just being together. I mean, I love my children, and they love me as of
right now. (Lindsay laughs) – The first line of this poem probably alludes to the
poetry of Walt Whitman, an American poet who died ten
years before Hughes was born. Initially, I was plugging away with all kinds of
different box curriculums. “I, too, sing America.” I tried everything, I
mean, not everything, but I tried a lot of things. I’d go through a financial decision of “Okay, well this is
most cost-effective, or this I don’t have
to print anything out, this tells me exactly what to do.” This paragraph has a period. “Now you sing your ABCs. Now you tell them that you love them. And now you,” I mean,
step-by-step instructions. And at some point, my oldest
got really burned out by that. What’s the last sound? What does this say? – Hat. – [Lindsay] Eduction is more
than just your school lessons, it’s your whole life. – The end. – Good job! Good job! Throughout the week, we go
through 21 different subjects. Not every subject is taught every day. Some of them are taught once a week, as in Citizenship and Music Appreciation and Art Appreciation. ♪[All] Mountain, flowery
meadow, flashing sea ♪ – [Lindsay] There’s
definitely a little bit of a lot of things. – Here you go. – [Lindsay] We do Tea
Time every day at four, or around four, and it’s just a time for
us to come back together and talk about our day and maybe something
that we need to work on, and we read a story or sing songs. – What? We’re going fishing? – They were adding and
subtracting with the alphabet. – In Greek? – I just really like
engaging with my children, and I really love being their
parent and their teacher at the same time. – [Boy] Really fast before you jump. – [Lindsay] I say if you’re
considering homeschooling, do it. Try it. It’s not about what the child knows, it’s about how much he cares. They don’t need to know all the facts. They don’t need to know all the reasons for every single thing. We wanna raise learners. We wanna raise lifelong learners. I wanna be a lifelong learner, so I’m learning, too. I’m learning right alongside them.