Home Schooling: Home Schooling vs. Home Programming

Home Schooling: Home Schooling vs. Home Programming

September 12, 2019 0 By Ronny Jaskolski


[MUSIC PLAYING] As with many other areas of
special education and special education law, terminology
can make a big difference in what happens. And this is one of those things
I’ve heard a lot, and it’s a mistake parents
need to be really aware of from the outset. There is a difference between
home schooling and wanting a home program. And many parents will
call me and say, I’m looking for home schooling. And as I ask them questions, I
realize what they really want is a program, a special
education program, provided by their school district, but
taking place in the home. And they’re very different
things. Right. And so one might augment a home
schooling program, and one might augment a program
that’s already happening at school. Do you follow me? I do follow you, and I think
the difference is this. In a situation where you’ve
decided to home school your child with a disability, you
are in all intents and purposes, usually, severing your
relationship with your public schools for that child. And you’re not doing that
for a home program. And a good example would be a
young preschool-aged child, let’s say who has a significant
need for a home program with therapists coming
into the home, and your child has been getting such a program
through their birth to three, or early intervention
services. Now they’re aging into the
school district age. And the parent says, well, I
think this is going well. I want it to happen here. And they think it’s home
schooling, because it’s happening at home, and
it’s schooling. But that’s not home schooling. And the repercussion is
dramatically different. Because if you fill out the
paperwork for home schooling when what you really wanted was
a home program, you have really created a problem that
doesn’t need to exist, because you may be entitled to have
that home program, special education program, provided
by your school district. Right. So another example of a home
program would be, let’s say you have a child who the
teachers come into your home to make sure that the IEP goals
they’re working on at school are being generalized
into the community and into the home setting. And so, there’s specific hours
allocated to the community or to the home, where you’re taking
data to make sure that those skills are being
generalized. Right. That’s really an extended school
day program, usually. Right? But again– Often referred to as
a home program. Exactly. And so, that’s not
the same thing as home schooling either. And another example might be,
let’s say you have a child who either becomes ill, temporarily
ill, or unfortunately, maybe for an
extended period of time, or who has a mental illness, or a
emotional disability that is preventing them from
going to school. And what you want is services in
the home, tutoring services to be provided, and maybe even
counseling services, for a period of time. Again, that usually is
referred to as either home-bound program, or
in-home tutoring. That’s, again, usually
not home schooling. And so we bring this up so that
parents don’t go down the road of filling out the
paperwork, which effectively severs their relationship with
their school district, who they don’t want to sever their
relationship with. And from home, they probably
require pretty important and necessary special education
services. So we just want to make sure
that you get those two terms straight, because we certainly
wouldn’t want you making any mistakes that you didn’t
intend to make.