College Advice from Harvard & UC Berkeley Grads! ๐ŸŽ“

College Advice from Harvard & UC Berkeley Grads! ๐ŸŽ“

October 23, 2019 100 By Ronny Jaskolski


Question & Answer Yay! I’m sorry. (speaking Korean) Hey, don’t cry. No, I’m always…
I’m crying internally, always. – Okay.
– (Korean) Okay. Hi, everyone!
Welcome back to my channel. Today, I have a special guest.
Claudine. This is your first time
on my main channel. – Yeah.
– But she’s been… in “Joanday” so many times. And in Joan life. I’m sorry. All right. So, we’re gonna do
the frequently asked Q and A for college, and I wanted to have Claudine
on my channel for this because she went to Harvard
and I feel like there’s… This is my first time – saying it on camera
– I know. It’s weird. So, it’s really weird.
All right. “Where did you go to college
and what did you major in?” I just revealed
that she went to Harvard and I went to UC Berkeley. So, what did you major in? I majored in Sociology and I did a minor in
Ethnicity Migration and Rights. So, at our school,
we don’t apply based on major, you have to… you get in, and then, for a year, you take whatever classes
you wanna take. And then, beginning
of your sophomore year, you declare
what we call “concentration.” Sorry, the lighting just went
boom! I know. I felt the… – I felt the light.
– Yeah. – It’s the sun.
– It’s enlightenment. Okay. I majored in Film
and Media Studies, and I had two minors
in Education Studies – and Korean Studies.
– Nice. It kinda like you,
I went undecided. But I think you can… you declare your major once you have
all the prerequisites down. – Oh, wow.
– And I… did that, like,
in my sophomore year. So, that was fun. I really loved
what I majored in. How did you decide that
that was going to be your major? Yeah. So, this is a question
that we got asked a lot of. And for me, I went into college knowing that I wanted to do something
in broadcasting, but I was always interested
in, like, Korea, – Yeah.
– ’cause I’m Korean-American. And also, education. How about you?
Why’d you choose those? I chose Sociology because I took a class on the dilemma and inequality
in K-12 education. And I remember sitting in class and it was the first thing
that, like, really broke my heart. And now, I’m really,
it just… I was learning about the education system in America,
and I felt like, I actually felt like my heart
was breaking, and I wanted to learn more
about this. Because I had never had
an emotional response in my classes
up until that point. And, so then, I asked, you know,
“Where can I study this one?” they directed me to Sociology. And then, my minor,
Ethnicity, Migration and Rights. I just took all these
elective classes that happened to fall
under this category, (Korean) I was like, “I wanna take
Asian American studies, and Latin American Studies” and I wanna take a little bit
about, like, Ethnography. And it just happened to fall
under one category, and I was like, “Oh, maybe
I make sense after all.” – Yeah.
– ‘Cause for me, it was just… I was feeling burned out and I wanted to take classes
that were interesting. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Did you change, like, majors,
while you were in college? I actually did. I… Well, I first thought
I was gonna do film. And then, I took a few
film seminars and it was not what I expected. Yeah. And I realized that I wasn’t actually
interested in film. I just thought the idea of it
was so sexy. And I was like, “Yeah,” like,
“Let’s do film, I wanna be a film producer.” And I was…
never held a camera. I don’t really watch
that much movies. It’s just,
I like the sound of it. – Yeah, yeah, yeah.
– And then, once I put myself in it,
I was like… “Yeah. This was all an idea.” Everyone thinks that,
when I tell them that, “Oh, I majored in Film….” They automatically think that, “Oh, it’s hands-on,
she creates.” No. At Cal, it’s all theory. You start from the beginning
of film. And you take courses where you have to watch three-hour black and white films
in silent. I’m sorry if anyone likes it, – but they’re really brutal.
– No, no. no. But I learned
to appreciate them and… The funny thing is, people are
like, “Oh, it’s an easy major. – You just watch movies.”
– No. And I was like,
being a Film major, you are basically
an English major, and you have to watch films. Yeah, so… I do wanna
put that out there because some people are like,
“Oh, my gosh. How could you call
yourself a Film major when you make all these…”
Like, like… I don’t know, like, my editing isn’t,
like, special. But they, like… That has nothing
to do with my Film degree. – I think you’re special. Fuck.
– Thanks. “Did you have a part-time job
when you were in college?” “How did you manage your time
and money wisely?” – Okay, you wanna go first?
– Yeah, I think. In college, I took just small
part-time tutoring jobs. Just… I mean, like, summer
jobs, etcetera. But, I mean… Honestly, on money managing, all of our food came
from the dining hall. So, you only ate out if you
really wanted to or had to, but all of that
was part of our… Must be nice. Yeah, admission packages,
you get… Its dining hall is tied in
with your housing. And about 98 percent of people
live in our housing system. So, you live with the roommates, – like, random roommates.
– Right. (speaking Korean) I’m trying to see how I…
I don’t… Honestly, I still think
I’m learning money management. I did have a part-time job. I actually at one… One of the
years, I had two part-time jobs. I’m very independent,
I don’t really show this. But the moment I had…
I got a job in college, that’s when I just, like, didn’t accept any money
from my parents. So, it was really
tough because… So, my classes were like this. All the education courses
were in the morning, and then, like,
my Korean study courses were always at two or three. And then, my Film courses
were always at night because screening. – So, I have, like,
– Yeah. all these random classes. So, I make sure I had, like,
part-times to fill in my time. I really tried my best
and I did get financial aid and scholarships. And yeah,
I did pull out loans mainly for… Not for school
because I was all, like, funded, but for, like, living-wise, I did pull out some
loans here and there. But I just did whatever I had
to do in the moment, and I did whatever – I thought was right
– Yeah. in the moment, yeah. But yeah, that was
the hardest thing for me. Like, trying to make money – and study at the same time.
– Yeah. But it all worked out.
I think it was great that, like, all my morning classes
were all education. And also, I’m a morning person, so it wasn’t… It wasn’t
hard for me to wake up at, like, – seven o’clock in the morning
– Yeah. Yeah. I mean, you really
have to, like, learn what you wanna balance your time – Of course.
– and what is necessary – from prior tradition.
– Right. (speaking Korean) And like, the on-campus jobs,
they pay quite well. So, I was very lucky
for that, too. Next question is “How do you
make friends in college? And I wanna ask how do you cope
with the amount of assignments and work in college
while having fun outside of it.” – All right.
– Making friends in… That’s… The first semester in college,
actually, I was… I kind of lost sense
of who I was. I fell into depression because I came from
a high school were I knew everybody since,
like, kindergarten. And I was there
with my three best friends and I felt like
I could do anything. And I came to Harvard and I… I didn’t know who
I was anymore because I held onto the fact that
I was class president and I did these things. But I remember one of the first
meetings, there’s about fourteen people in my entry way. And they asked, “Oh, how many of
you guys were class presidents or, like, student
body president?” Everybody rose their hand.
And I was like… Oh, hey, okay, like… Dude, that’s intense. – I just got chills.
– Yeah, I know. And I remember… I think… The thing is,
we all looked at each other and we’re all like, “Oh, man.” Because, you know,
in high school that’s, that’s what define me. I was, like, the, you know,
the crazy class president – and then I was…
– It’s true because, actually, we have some mutual friends
and I was like, “Oh, my gosh. I met Claudine.”
And they were like, “You know Claudine Cho?
She’s intense.” – I’m like, “Please do explain.”
– I was… I was really intense – in high school.
– Yeah, yeah, yeah. And, in college, like, maybe the first week,
they talked about, like, “Oh, what were you like
in high school?” But then, none of that matters – after.
– None of it matters. – You have to start from zero.
– Yeah. And I didn’t know how to do that without my best friends
by my side. So, I would, like,
watch YouTube videos of my high school dances. Like, we had rallies,
I watched that a lot. And I would, like, call home. And I didn’t leave my room
for days at a time. I remember I would,
like, go to class like, wearing the same things
that I wore, like, three days in a row with, like,
makeup still smudged. And I just thought, if I’m not these things
that I spent, you know, I don’t know,
18 years of my life building up who am I and I…
That was the question, like, who am I if everything
that I have, all my shield and armor is stripped from me? And I, I couldn’t even
laugh anymore. My college roommate, she’s heard me on the phone
talking to my best friend. And she was like, “Baby Cho…”
She would call me Baby Cho. And she was like,
“Baby Cho, I… That’s the first time
I’ve heard you laugh.” And knowing, like, anybody
who knows me now, like, they know how, like… They were like,
“That doesn’t make any sense.” – I laugh all the time.
– Yeah. But I, I lost my laughter
and that was really hard. But the next semester,
I just decided to say yes
to literally anything. Someone’s like, “Hey,
I noticed you wear red lipstick. Can you be the makeup artist for our fashion show.”
I’m like, “Yeah!” And I go. I’ve never done makeup
on anyone in my life. – I go and I’m like…
– Red lipstick! Yeah.
“You get some red lipstick. You get some red lipstick. Everybody gets
some red lipstick.” And that’s how I actually
started making friends ’cause that’s one… I know this sounds really, not cheesy but it just
sounds so trivial but, I remember my best friends
would tell me, “Claudine,
when you go to Harvard, make sure you don’t lose
the red lipstick.” Like, “Always still wear that.”
And I’m not wearing it now. – But she almost did, actually.
– But I, you know, I always do. And I just kind of decided to…
I decided to stand out because I just… It suffocated me
to fit into a mold that I didn’t even understand, – so…
– Yeah. No, I just started
making friends by… Honestly, stop trying to be who I thought
a Harvard person was because that doesn’t exist. Everyone’s very, very different. There are no standards there. One of my high school friends
knew someone – that was going to Berkeley.
– Yeah. And, you know,
a lot of my friends were, like, – looking out for me.
– Yeah. And they were like,
“Oh, I want to introduce you to the person I know
that’s going to Berkeley.” So, I actually went in
knowing, like, – a good amount of people, like,
– Yeah. with mutual friends. But freshman year,
everybody wants to make friends. – Yeah, for sure.
– So, it was easy for me to, like, just go next door,
introduce myself, and like, “Hey, do you want to
get lunch or something?” And, – Yeah.
– everybody is just so friendly. – Yeah.
– And I had… Yeah, I was surrounded
by a lot of good people. And then, kinda like you, I tried to stay involved in a lot of, like, clubs,
fellowships, things like that. – Yeah.
– So, that – made it quite easy for me.
– Yeah. I think just… I think that’s great advice, that everybody wants
to make friends. No one is there being like, “Oh, I have a ton of friends.
I don’t need to make any.” That might be the exterior because they’re trying
to protect themselves from rejection – True.
– in friendships and whatnot. But just try to be
the first person to be like, “Hey, do you mind
if I sit here?” – Yeah!
– Earn friends with like, – Yeah!
– “Where are you from?” And I did that not so much my freshman year,
which I regret. But a lot during my sophomore,
junior years, senior years, I’m like, “Yo, I’ve seen you
around campus, and I really vibe with you”. And then like… – You’re weird.
– I know. I was used to it
That’s why I was like, “What?” No, but I wouldn’t like, “Yeah. – Do you wanna… Can I…”
– That’s it. – Okay, but here…
– But also, your was class like, – how, how big?
– Yeah, it was… We had a graduating class
of 1,600. And we’re split into houses,
kind of like “Harry Potter.” And there’s 12. So, you see
the same people a lot. And you’ll get to sit
and do work – with them, but…
– True. A lot of times when I’m like,
I would go to see performances and I’m like, “Hey,
I saw you in that theater play. I was moved”, and… And you just become friends
when you decide – to reach out to them.
– That’s true. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Okay. What was the second part
to that question? It was “I wanna ask how do you cope
with the amount of assignments and work in college
while having fun outside of it.” To be honest, I wanted to have fun first
before doing the assignments. – (speaking Korean)
– Yeah. But how did I cope
with these assignments… So, I got in the habit of… So, like, my first year of
college, I, like, didn’t care. – Yeah.
– Like, I got so many Bs. Like, you know,
in high school, you’re always – going for the As.
– Yeah, yeah, yeah. In, in college, I was, like,
“All right. A, great. But, like, at least, B.” – Like that. That’s how it was.
– Yeah. And I mean,
I had fun, you know, like, I didn’t care so much
about the GPA. Like, in high school,
I was so stressed about, like, maintaining
a certain GPA ’cause – I want to go to college.
– Yeah. But in college, I felt like, “Oh, the job I wanna do
in the future, it doesn’t require me
sharing my GPA”. So I was, like,
that kinda, like, – you know, calmed me down
– Yeah. a little bit. But yeah, I got in the habit of, like, making sure I wrote
the notes I took in class. And then, when I went home,
I transferred it all, but to… I typed it all. While I was typing, I was basically reviewing
all of my notes. – And then, yeah, so,
– That’s true. – that was very helpful.
-That’s a good study habit. – Yeah, yeah, yeah.
– Yeah, for sure. And then, whenever I, like, had
a midterm, like, a week before, I remembered all those things,
like, so much… – Yeah.
– It was a lot easier for me to study because I got into the habit
of doing that. I… You should get into
the habit of doing that. I, I did not. – What’s that one?
– “What, what makes you not cry at night when you realize
you don’t know what you’re doing
with your life?” Second semester, freshman year,
I pretty much cried almost every single day
before I went to sleep. And then my junior year,
I kinda did the same and so, I did the same – in senior year, too.
– Yeah. – I just cried.
– Yeah. And I had roommates, so they would all
come into my room, and they would,
you know, like… My college friends are,
like, my best friends. I’m not even kidding. – You guys have met
– Yeah. so many of them
if you watched “Joanday.” But, like, Christine,
Sharon, Janice, Joanne. Like, I can name
so many great people – Yeah.
– that I met in college, and they were there for me. And I was there for them, too,
when they had – those nights, too.
– For sure. So, like, I think crying is okay,
and I got lucky because my friends
would come into my room and ask what… what’s wrong. And then I would, like,
cry so much, and they would cry
with me and, like… I was just so thankful – for those moments actually
– Yeah. because I’m, like,
“These people are here for me. They care about me. And they’re gonna be
my friends forever”. And that’s when I was, like, – “I’m so lucky
– Yeah. – that I have them.”
– For sure. I think, I, I mean,
I still break down every, like, you know, once or twice a year,
like, big breakdowns, where I’m like,
“Oh, I thought I was doing this, but that didn’t quite work out.
What am I doing now?” And I remember my senior year,
the best advice I was given by this dean
of Harvard Business School and this boss-ass Korean woman.
And… She said, “You know your 20s
are the best years of your life because, you know, you’re on
kind of like a rollercoaster. In six months, you’ll say… You would say,
“I really wanna do this!” And six months later,
you’ll be like, “Oh, that didn’t
really work out.” – Yeah.
– And you try something else, and another thing,
and another thing… And she said, “You know, I’m 50-something now. And I look back on my life,
and none of it was planned out.” I thought she was gonna tell me
you need a 5, 10, 15-year plan because she’s in
business school. But she told me
just make decisions that feel honest to you
at that time. And… Just take it from there. And that,
this will lead you to here, to here, to here, to here. And so, I think I can’t say what I’m gonna be doing
in five years, but I can tell you
that this very moment, I know what feels honest
to me right now. And I know that today’s decision
is going to impact tomorrow’s, and I’ll just take it
from there. But don’t stress yourself out
trying to say, “I’m gonna do this thing!”
because… We’ve both done that many times, it’s like, I’m gonna do
this thing and it… – It doesn’t work out.
– Right. And that’s totally fine.
I feel like… – Failure is a good thing.
– Yeah. Because I think that… I kind of think of it like they’re bumpers
on a bowling alley where, like, you fail and it… You hit this bumper
and it hurts so hard, – but it pivots you back.
– Keeps you going. – Yeah.
– You keep going, going, going. Eventually, you’ll… – You’ll hit the pins.
– Right. I don’t know if that metaphor
made sense, but… You’ll… So, Claudine is gonna write
a book. So, I’m just… You know, just letting you know. This is why she’s so poetic
with the words. You’ll eventually get there. – And it will make sense to you
– Yeah. in hindsight. I totally agree
with you on this. “What foods remind you
of your college days? And what did you eat a lot of
while attending college?” – I know my answer!
– Okay, you can go first. Okay, so before going to college Taeyang released – “I Need A Girl.”
– Oh, my God. And in “I Need A Girl,” he sings about
kimchi bokkeumbap. And I didn’t
even like fried rice. And then that song, I’m not even kidding,
I’m not even kidding, made me love fried rice.
Kimchi fried rice. So, in college,
I had so much of it. And I’m… No, but that, like,
really reminds me of college because all my friends
would be like, “Oh, make me kimchi fried rice.” because they liked
my kimchi fried rice. It was better than
Bear’s Ramen’s. But, like, restaurants
I can think of, like D’Yar is like a Mediterranean food. So good. And then, Top Dog. – I love bread
– I’ve actually heard… – I’ve heard of Top Dog.
– It’s so good. – Yeah.
– Where’s that? There’s a… – burrito place somewhere.
– La Burrita? – So that one’s the place?
– So good, we had chipotle. We had so many restaurants. Like, I gained
Freshman 15 and above. – I gained 17 pounds. Yeah.
– Fifteen plus. – Seventeen pounds. Yeah.
– Oh, my gosh. I ate so much. And when I had, like,
meal points… Bagels. I had two bagels
every morning. I’m not even kidding. – Why are you laughing?
– Totally legit. It’s just ’cause
it’s a lot of bagels. I know. Hot sauce reminds me
a lot of college. – No. Honestly, because…
– She can’t eat spicy food. – No. Now, I can. But like…
– Now, she can. Yeah. Freshman… Just ’cause we ate
in the dining hall so often, and the meal was pretty… It was similar from day-to-day. So I would just pour
Tabasco sauce on everything. And I got heartburn. And so, then for a week
I had to drink, like, soy milk. So hot… Is this a sad story?
Why is everything I say so sad? Actually, Domino’s Pizza
reminds me most of college – because it was…
– Yes. Pizza. Because every meeting, when you’re trying to get people
to come to your meetings, you would order food.
And Domino’s was the cheapest. – Like, 555.
– Yes. – So yes!
– You would just go to random meetings
and you’re like, “Oh, yeah. For sure,
I’ll sign up for your club.” – Take some pizza and run away.
– Yeah, pizza. “How did you get
into your college?” So, it changes every year. And I know for a fact that it’s a lot harder
to get into my school now. And I’m sure you feel… – Same.
– the same way. But basically, what I did
before applying to schools is that I wanted to see
what was… what the average was. So, I think, back then,
like, the average SAT score was, like, 20-100. And like, the average GPA
was, like… Non-weighed was, like, 3.8? And like, weighed was, like,
4.3 and above? And like, there were a lot
of these statistics, and I was like,
“Okay, this is, like, gonna be what I’m gonna go for.” But except, I didn’t do that
for UC Berkeley. – Yeah.
– I did it for UCLA ’cause I really want to go
to UCLA. But, so… that’s how I kinda,
like, prepared myself for the application process. But I think what made
my application special was that I am the first person
to go to college in America in our family. And, like, I had no idea – about what college was.
– Yeah. So, when I was a freshman
in high school, I didn’t really care
about college. So, like, my grades were just
kind of like… – It was okay.
– Yeah. But it wasn’t like, straight As. But I met up with my counselor,
and then that’s when I was like, “Oh, I need to, like, care
about college.” So, that’s when I was like, “All right. I…
I wanna take these classes.” – Yeah.
– And then, I… my GPA every year just went up. – And I think…
– That’s really good. I think Berkeley saw that,
and they were like, “Okay.” Yeah, ’cause they know
you can do it, it’s just… if you go the opposite way,
that’s the problem. – Yeah.
– But progress… Yeah, I think…
it showed progress in like… Every year, I, like, added, like, two or three more
extracurriculars on top of that. So, I was pretty intense
in high school, too. I know you were intense ’cause all my friends
told me you were. But, yeah… Honestly speaking, I feel like everyone thinks
that there’s a magic number or there are certain points
that you have to hit. But you never quite know because Harvard to me
was the dream too big to dream. And I was like, “Who am I to think
that I could even apply?” And I… I wasn’t gonna apply
until very last minute. My mom told me, “You know,
you worked really hard. Why not try?” Honestly, any opportunity
that I saw in high school, I took it. And I wanna say… I know that a lot of opportunity
in high school, you just do it
to pad your resume. But there are certain times
when I was like… Even for my resume,
I don’t think I can do this. This just doesn’t feel – honest to me.
– Yeah. And I think colleges
can tell if… You can tell a story
through the… the way… the movement
that you make from freshman year
to senior year. – And…
– For sure. I didn’t do much
my freshman year in high school, but I slowly started adding
things that I cared about, like Korean club or debate and class… like student government. You can even guess
what they’re looking for. I think that… It’s not a numbers game,
it’s not even a lot game. It’s, “Are you the best fit
for this college?” And, “Is this college
the best fit for you?” Because they’re technically
making an investment in you. – You…
– Right, it’s true. They see your potential,
and they say, “Can this person grow
in our environment? Can they be this person
that they want to be?” And they do case by case basis. So, I remember, I like… I got into Harvard, but I got rejected
from a handful of other schools. And I was like, how was I… Like, I really wanted to go
to these other schools as well. And… It just… I just wasn’t
the right puzzle piece for their puzzle. – And they weren’t for mine.
– Yeah. Well, in hindsight. Last question is, “What’s your favorite memory
from college? Also, was your college
far from your house? And how did you deal
with being homesick?” So, let’s… – Let’s answer the…
– Three questions. Let’s answer
the homesick part first. – Yeah.
– And then, end – on a happier note.
– Yeah. Homesickness… – Yeah, I mean…
– That’s the thing. You probably had it – a lot more than I did.
– Yeah. I… You know, I… I mean, distance is distance. But I think… What did I do?
People actually did get seasonal depression in Boston. Because, it got dark at,
like, 4:00 p.m. in the winter. It snowed my first time.
Like, having real snow on me. Like, obviously. Homesickness… I think the important thing is to not get sucked back
into Facebook or Instagram, and checking in on how your
friends back home are doing. That actually
exacerbates homesickness, – I find.
– Yeah. Sometimes. Because you’re, like, – left out on a lot of things.
– Yeah. So, for me,
when I felt homesick, I first started kind of removing myself
from my current situation, and calling my friends
back home and relying on them. But I think the cure
to homesickness is to put yourself even more
in the space that you are. Like, explore more parts
of the city. I explored more parts of Boston – with friends.
– Right. I’d go on adventures and make new memories
of where I was now. And so, I think that’s
the best way to cure it, because it’s… I mean… – There really is no other…
– Life goes on and you have… – You can…
– You have… Life goes on and you have to
keep moving with it. – Definitely.
– Like, you really do. You can’t get left behind
for sure. For me,
I didn’t get homesick that much ’cause, I mean,
I was still in California. And because a lot of my friends
were from SoCal, it’s so funny because I met
a lot of SoCal people, – like, in college. Yeah.
– They gravitate towards you, – for sure.
– We just like… We’re like, “All right, let’s drive home.” So, like, a lot of my
upperclassmen friends, they were like
“All right, let’s drive down.” And so, we have so many, like, spontaneous trip back home. – Yeah.
– It was… It was really great. And like, tickets, like,
they randomly go on sale, so whenever it was,
like, 49 dollars, we’re like, “All right, booking
the tickets for home!” Like, just book
as many as you can. Wait, what’s the question so… I personally didn’t feel
that homesick because people around me
were home. – Yeah.
– Yeah. So, we’re like, “All right, you want
to go home? Let’s go home.” Yeah, so just – good friends around you.
– Yeah. And like, I remember like… For… You guys all know Sharon.
You know Sharon. We, like, drove down
together often, and we would talk
for like six, seven hours. And that itself would
be such a good memory, because, you know, you’re, like getting to know
this person even more even though you knew…
I don’t know. Those… The drive down and also up were always
quite memorable. – Yeah.
– Yeah. There are so many good – memories of it.
– Yeah. It’s a hard one to answer ’cause you can answer,
I’m thinking… When you read
the question aloud, like, a ton of memories
just like, like… Just started bubbling up – to the surface.
– Yeah. And like, wow, I miss all – my friends from college.
– Yeah. I think one of the most… The most memorable ones are the ones that are
actually not… If you speak it out loud,
it’s not very memorable at all. It’s just… Just good time
with your friends. – Spending a lot… Yeah.
– Staying up till 4:00 a.m. – not studying, but talking.
– Yeah. It’s talk…
And seriously, talking with your friends late at night. Or just spontaneous trips
down the city. Also studying abroad, we both
studied abroad, actually. The… Oh, yeah. That’s a… – That’s a separate video.
– That’s a separate memory. Like, portion of my head. But I think the memories
that are most memorable is when you take spontaneous… You’re just like,
“Hey, why don’t we just…” – Drive to the city.
– Yeah. Let’s go to SoCal. Or, “Do you wanna
go get pizza right now?” like, at two o’clock in the morning,
he’s like, “Hey, late night.” – Like, we did a lot of that.
– Yeah. Just walking around. For me… Like, walking around
Harvard Square like, blasting music or just, like
rapping down the street and… Oh, man. Just… There isn’t one – memorable moment
– For sure. It’s just every single one – spent with good people.
– Yeah. So, for those of you guys who are applying to college,
enjoy it. I know it’s stressful right now, – Yeah.
– but it will all be worth it. And for those of you guys
who are in college and are stressed right now, – I get it.
– Yeah. But again, like… Everything is happening
for a reason, – Yeah.
– and that’s just gonna mold you into a better… better version
of you. – Yeah, for sure.
– Right? So… And also,
for those post-grads… – Fighting.
– Yeah. Yeah. We’re… we’re right there
with you. We’re right there with you. If I could just give one tip,
though, when you guys are applying
to college. When you’re writing your essays, make sure you’re doing it
in your voice. Because I’ve read so many
college essays, and it’s… you can tell when someone is not being honest to themselves. You can just… – it feels a little off.
– Right. And if you’re getting help
writing your essays, get little amounts of help. I don’t know how else
to explain it. It just… No, I get what you mean. You have to write experiences
that are honest to you and can… It doesn’t have to be… or I would say, don’t write
about the moments that you think – sound impressive.
– Yeah. And write about the moment… I mean, my friend wrote about you know, her being
half-Chinese, half-Romanian, talked about, like, dumplings.
Or like… – Really?
– Yeah. There was – That’s so cool.
– a lot of interest… Or my other friend, he wrote
about how he walks really slow. And how he’s lived in Tennessee,
and Korea, – and, like, New England.
– Wow. And how his pace of life
has always remained the same. So, it’s about taking mundane… Try taking a mundane experience
and extracting it. And you don’t need to have
a dramatic event in your life. You don’t need
a volunteer trip to – Costa Rica or wherever else,
– Right. because you can’t buy
memorable experiences like that. It’s just… you have – to find… Yeah.
– Be you in your essays. You don’t need to have
five difficult SAT words – in one sentence, like…
– Yeah, for sure. Be yourself. I mean, I… I’m like,
while you were explaining, I was like,
what did I write about? – Yeah.
– And I think I wrote about being Korean-American. What did you write about? I wrote about how… what it means
to step down as a leader. – All right.
– Those… – Those… I know I’m like…
– This video is so intense We should, like, shake it up. I hope you guys found
this video helpful. This is a video I really wanted
to do for you guys, mainly because every time I do,
like, a Q and A, or when I visit my college,
people are like, “please do a college video.” – So, hopefully, it was helpful.
– Yeah. Give it a thumbs-up
if you love Claudine. And if you enjoyed this video. And I’ll see you guys
in my next one. Thank you. Thanks. Thanks for watching! – Two.
– Dude, we filmed for so long. – How long?
– I don’t think I ever filmed… No, every time I film…