Carter Jones: A Competitive Skater Gets Schooled

Carter Jones: A Competitive Skater Gets Schooled

October 11, 2019 1 By Ronny Jaskolski


I got involved in ice skating when I was
about seven years old. I saw it on TV, and I fell in love with it and it was
something that I wanted to try. My name is Carter Jones and I am a psychology
major at Drexel and I used to be a professional ice skater. I started
skating at Virginia Beach and as I got older, I relocated up to Aston,
Pennsylvania, where there was more competitive coaches, and more ice times. I started skating with Richard who was my partner for four years and we skated
for England for four years. RICHARD: She’s very goal-oriented. She’s very
focused. When she sets a target, she’s going to achieve it no matter what. CARTER: My education has always been really important to me, so not going to college just wasn’t an option. Being able to still work through my undergraduate
degree and be a competitive skater was really convenient with the Drexel online
program. My day started at like 6 a.m. Every day,
I’d wake up. Train for two hours on the ice. Going over programs. Lifts and spins and footwork. And then I’d have lunch, and I would usually do homework on my breaks. Get back on the ice for another two hours. Go over the programs again. A lot of repetition in our training. We also had off-ice. Strength and conditioning. Ballet. Stretching. I would go home and then it was just kind of homework from 5 o’clock through the rest of the day. We were interested in going to Olympics, that was
a big goal for us. There were a lot of barriers that we didn’t know we were
gonna face with me being an American citizen. Ultimately for me, it was a
decision between, you know, just continuing to skate kind of for fun,
or do I need to put this aside and work more towards my educational and career
goals. I am really interested in pursuing
family psychology, adolescent psychology, and couples therapy. Growing up in such a
competitive environment was actually really lonely at times. It was difficult
to make like good quality friends. I didn’t have immediate access to my
parents. They were always really supportive and there for me, but a phone
call is way different than a hug. RICHARD: I think that being in the sport that we’re in,
there’s a lot of mental challenges, and I think that she’s experienced a lot of
those, and I think it’s made her a very strong person, a very understanding
person. CARTER: As I got older, I sought out the help of a psychologist. I worked with her
for seven years, and she was able to help me grow in a way that I I don’t know if
I would have been able to grow without her. If I can give that experience to
someone else, that would just be really fulfilling.