2017-09 Community Forum: The Status of Latinos & Higher Education with Assemblyman Chris Holden

2017-09 Community Forum: The Status of Latinos & Higher Education with Assemblyman Chris Holden

September 6, 2019 0 By Ronny Jaskolski


>>If there is anyone who would
like a translation device, we have them at the
entrance to my left. And we do have our — one
of our Spanish teachers from Marshall, Michaela. She’s available also, correct?>>Yes.>>And is she here?>>So we — Hello. So we have Ms. Connie Dalves
here if anyone needs translation or interpretation services. So –>>Connie, can you
come forward please? Thank you. Everyone give Connie
a round of applause. [ Applause ] [ Foreign Language Spoken ] So Espanol is a little
bit rusty for me. So I’m going to have
Connie announce that if you need a translation
device that you can go to that table over
there to get one. Thank you. [ Foreign Language Spoken ]>>Thank you Connie. Good evening everyone. My name is Dr. Cynthia Olivo. I’m the vice-president
of Student Services here at Pasadena City College. And it’s my pleasure to
welcome you tonight to PCC. I — It — it also gives me a
tremendous amount of pleasure to introduce to you our
— our college president. And he’s worked here — This
is his third academic year. He is somebody who
understands what it is to overcome a life
of challenges. He grew up overseas in a country
that, as he describes it, you know, there was
no running water. You know, he understood
what it was to be treated as though you don’t belong. And it really — That
empathy that he utilizes in his leadership, it’s
valued and it shows, and we’re going to miss him. He’s retiring at the
end of this year. So please help me welcome
and thank Dr. Vurdien. [ Applause ]>>Thank you Dr. Olivo. Buenas tardes and good
evening everybody. Welcome to Pasadena
City College. It gives me great
pleasure tonight to see all of you assembled here, as
we look at what we can do to improve the lot
of our students — our students that belong
to ethnic minority groups. Remember that Pasadena
City College is more and more being reflective of
what the state is looking like and what the nation
is looking like. We are a Hispanic-serving
institution. Last year, we passed
the 51 percent mark of our student population
of Latino origin. It is therefore important
that we do everything to better serve this population. As Dr. Olivo mentioned
earlier on, I do what — understand what it means
to be a minority student in a majority environment. At Pasadena City College, we
have been working very hard and we will continue
working very hard to provide the support
services that are so important for students to succeed. Under the able leadership
of Dr. Olivo in the Student Services
division, we have increased counseling. We have increased tutoring. We have increased every kind
of support that is necessary for a student to understand
what college means. If you are a first
generation college student, if you come from a family where your parents don’t even
have a high school education, you do not know how to
navigate the system. It is so important that we
provide that type of leadership. When a student comes to
campus for the first time, and by the time that student
graduates from the college, that student will
have been in contact with so many different
areas of the college. All it takes is for
one area of the college to give a negative
feedback to that student to turn that student off. And when that happens,
the research that we have available shows
that about 65 to 75 percent of cases, those students go
away and they never come back. Our goal here is to
ensure that our staff, that our faculty
understand that concept so that we create a welcoming
environment for our students to feel that they are at home
at Pasadena City College. We have done everything we
can over the past two years to increase the training
of our faculty and what diversity means. Our faculty, our staff
have been exposed to that, so that when we go
through hiring committees, we understand what
diversity means and we treat every application
in exactly the same manner. Consequently over
the past two years, we have significantly increased
the number of faculty belonging to diverse groups on our staff. We have significantly
increased the members of various diverse groups
in our administration, in our classified and in
various areas of the college. We want to create a
college where our faculty and our staff are representative
of the student body that we have at the college. And I do hope that the event
we have tonight will provide an opportunity for everybody to better understand
what diversity is and how we can better
serve our students. Enjoy the evening. I will have to run
to another event where the college is being
honored by the AME Church at the 130th anniversary today. So, I thank you all
for being here. Have a wonderful evening. Thank you. [ Applause ] And now it gives me great
pleasure to welcome Assemblyman, Chris Holden to the podium. Mr. Holden is a friend
of the college, is a friend of the community,
and under his leadership, we have been able at
the state level — we have been able to promote
the Dual Enrollment Program, which has been a passion of his. And thanks to this,
we will be able to have high school
students take college classes and get a head start as
they come to college. Please join me in
welcoming Mr. Holden. [ Applause ]>>Well, good afternoon.>>Good afternoon.>>It’s a pleasure to be here. And certainly I want
to say thank you to Dr. Vurdien before he
leaves for his leadership here at Pasadena City College, but
actually beyond just the — the boundaries of
this fine institution. Your leadership has extended
well into the entire district that PCC covers, and
so we just want to say, thank you for your commitment,
thank you for your partnership, and we look forward even if you
are retiring to be a resource to all of us as time
goes forward. You’re a great man
for — for education. Thank you for all you done. [ Applause ] And good evening.>>Good evening.>>I mean, I like
to say welcome to — for attending tonight’s Status
of Latinos in Higher Education. This is a community forum
where we really wanted to bring the community
together so that we could focus on the issues that are
specific in terms of educating and removing barriers for
Latinos in our community. This is an opportunity for us
to really delve into issues and really be complete,
transparent and understand how
the system is working and how it is not working, and
how we can do a better job. It’s a pleasure to —
to be here and to join with campaign College
for Opportunity for cohosting this event with
my office and for the dedication to educational excellence
as we preview your report, The State of Higher Education
in California Latino. We have several local
organizations that have cosponsored
tonight’s event, and I’d like to take
an opportunity to thank them as well. They are Education Trust-West,
University of La Verne, University of California
Los Angeles, California State
University Los Angeles, The California State University
Office of the Chancellor and Pasadena Unified
School District. I’d also like to acknowledge
the Planning Committee. These events don’t just
happen on their own, and so I’d like to acknowledge
the hard work and dedication of Dr. Cynthia Olivo,
Dr. Michaela Mares-Tamayo from Pasadena City College,
Audrey Dow from The Campaign for College Opportunity,
Marisela Cervantes from the California State
University Chancellor’s Office, Vannia De La Cuba,
Field Representation for Council Member Victor Gordo
in Pasadena, Gilbert Barraza from the Pasadena Unified School
District, former principal of Pasadena High School
where I graduated, so I have to give you a
special shout-out, Daniel Loera from University of La
Verne, Stella Murga from Adelante Youth Alliance
and Jamie Zamora from UCLA. We are excited that thoughtful
minds are collaborating and focusing on this
important issue. Investing in our young people’s
mind is the wisest investment. There is a lot of interest in providing educational
opportunities for creative young people
so that they succeed in school, as well as in life. I’m looking forward to a
robust and honest dialogue. Thanks to the leadership of
Campaign for College Opportunity and their interest in
addressing this issue. We will hear tonight highlights
from the report’s findings and identify best
practices to consider in addressing disparities
and inequities and access opportunity
and achievement. We will feature a panel of
leaders in our community who are working to
address this issue. But first of all, I would like
to invite up two students, Diana Castro, a sophomore at
UCLA and Sebastian Jordan, a senior at Cal Poly San Luis
Obispo to share their experience in — in regarding
college access. So, if I could have
them come forward. [ Applause ]>>Good evening everybody.>>Good evening.>>How you doing? How you doing? So my name is Sebastian Jordan and I’m a fourth-year
Civil Engineer student at San Luis Obispo. First off, I’d just like to
thank you guys for having me and letting me tell
a part of my story. My story begins with my
grandma, an illegal immigrant at the time struggling
to raise ten children. At the age of 16, my mom had to
drop out of high school in order to help support the
household financially. And in due to these
financial hardships, she never had the availability
to focus on a higher education. When the time come,
she had children. She realized how important
it was for me and my siblings to have an educational
role model in our lives. So about the time I
started high school, she also started the
Nursing Program here at Pasadena City College. I would come back
from school every day and see my mom coming
back from work, working on her homework
just like me, right next to me
at the same table. And this really pushed
me to do what I could do and to the best that
I could do it. Although my mom was receiving
a higher — higher education, she was not done with it
when the time came to apply for four-year universities. And she was just
as lost as I was. Although she was able to
help me with me studies, she was not able to help
me with this next step. And that is where the
teachers and administration of my high school came in. I had wonderful teachers such
as Mr. Michaelson, Mr. — Mr. Van Akron [Assumed Spelling]
and Dr. Verdi, who were able to push me to take
education more seriously. When I thought I couldn’t
do it, they said, “Hey, instead of just taking this
class, take that extra AP. Go for the A. Don’t
just settle for the B.” And because of that, I can honestly say I
am where I am today. When it came time for
applications to universities, I was also lost, but thankfully
I had the administration at my school to help me out. People like Mr. Barraza and
Mr. Tran were able to help me out with my applications,
with financial aid and with other things that
go along with that process. And thanks to those people, I
was able to get my full tuition at Cal Poly San Luis
Obispo covered. I’m happy to — When someone’s
accepted to a university, it is not just that student
who is going to school, but their family, their friends,
their neighbors, their teachers, their school and
their community. I know that every day
at San Luis Obispo, I know that I couldn’t be
there without receiving helping from absolutely everybody
who impacted me, and I bring them
with me every day. It takes a village. Thank you for your time. [ Applause ]>>Hi everyone. My name is Diana Castro. I also went to Pasadena
High School. I graduated Class of 2016. And I’m currently an
incoming sophomore at Neuroscience major at UCLA. I start school next
Thursday actually. I can attribute the majority
of my success to my parents. My dad is actually here
today, supporting me today. [ Applause ] I am not a first
generation college student. My dad got his Bachelor’s
in Fine Arts from CSUN and my mom went to
Glendale Community College and LA Trade Tech to learn more
about her passion in fashion. From a very young age,
as far as I can remember, both of parents made
sure I was comfortable in a library setting. We would always go to the
library, whether it was, like, those family events
where there’s, like, storytelling or painting
classes. We would always go
when I was a child. And my dad actually
takes community — community college
courses in subjects that he’s interested in. He’s actually taking a
Computer Programming course here I believe. It’s here, right? Yeah. So, as I got older, we
would go the library very often. And we would both
study together, like, my dad would be working on his,
like, language course, studying and I would be doing my stuff
for school right next to him. So, from a very young age, I
learned to discipline myself and have good study skills. And in terms of how I
prepared for college, I took ten AP courses at PHS. I passed all the AP exams. I took Human Anatomy here,
and I can say that was, like, the hardest class I had
ever taken up to that point. That class I think
definitely prepared me for UCLA because it was summer
session when I took it, so it’s a lot shorter
than the regular semester and it’s pretty crazy. Like, we would get, like,
a hundred slide PowerPoints and we had weekly exams. And I remember on
the very first day, the professor asked everyone
to introduce themselves, and people were going
around the room, and it was just like,
Hi, my name is Cathy. I’m a Radiology major. My name is Ryan. I’m a Nursing major,
and then came to me, and it was, like, I’m Diana. I’m in high school. And, like, somebody clapped
in the back of the room and I was like, okay, that
was unnecessary, but — So I felt like my peers kind of
expected me not to do very well because I was 16 and, you know,
unsure of life or whatever. But, apart from the pressure I
had from my family and myself to do well in the course, I wanted to prove
my classmates wrong that I could actually
do well in the course. So, my dad helped
me study, you know. My parents were always helping
me come up with new ways to study if something
wasn’t working. I ended up doing
well in the course. But that’s just community
college experience. So in high school,
I was very fortunate to have two amazing counselors,
Mr. Tran and Ms. Senaris who I heard was going to be
here today, but I don’t see her. But both of them were very
helpful in the process. I think the most stressful
time in high school for me was senior year
because I had to learn how to balance writing the
college application essay, as well as balancing
all my courses. And I was so scared
writing the essay. And fortunately I started
a rough draft very early, and I was able to go to
both of my counselors and ask for their feedback. And we prepared months in
advance, and I was able to write a solid essay,
and here I am today. Apart from that, I also
had very receptive teachers that were willing to
share some time with me and make sure I understood
the material. For example, my AP Biology
teacher, Ms. Giacalone, we would have, like, weekly
exams and stuff, and she — I guess the equivalent of office
hours in college would be, like, advisory in high school,
and she would let me come in during advisory and go over
problems I missed on tests and ask her questions and
take notes on what I missed. And with her help, I was
able to do all the AP exams. So, all in all, I would like
to thank all my teachers, my counselors, my parents for helping me become the
person I am today, and, yeah. Thank you very much. [ Applause ]>>Well thank you
Diane and Sebastian. You do us proud. Certainly you are making
your commitment to education, putting in the time,
working hard and you have a supportive
family, and so congratulations to you. And we’re looking for big
things from both of you. And — and just know as you
hear from these professionals and see this community here,
they’re here to be supportive because it does take a village. And you are going to have
to occupy these seats that we hold right
at the moment. So we look forward to
your continuing to grow in your educational experience,
and we continue to learn from you and look forward
to strengthening the — the process so that it — it’s even better for the
young people to follow. Now, it’s my opportunity
and my pleasure to introduce our first
presenter, Michelle Siqueiros, who is the Executive
Director at the Campaign for College Opportunity. The Campaign for
College Opportunity works to ensure all Californians have
an equal opportunity to attend and succeed in college. Ms. Siqueiros will be providing
some highlights and her vision for how we can utilize
the report to address the problems
getting campuses and hold an educational — and hold educational
leaders accountable. Please join me in
welcoming Ms. Siqueiros. [ Applause ]>>Hi everyone. How is everyone?>>Good.>>Good, thank you. We are just going to
get set up really quick. Thank you Assemblymember
Holden for inviting us to have this conversation. I think it’s a good
expression of the leadership that we need amongst our
policy makers and your passion and interest for
education in particular and higher education more
specifically is something we should all be proud of. I suspect that the
Assemblymember may not share all the many ways that he has been
focusing on higher education, so — Or maybe he will later. But I’m going to do it for him because I think we need
more strong leadership on — on this front and just in,
you know, the last year alone, his priorities, his legislative
track record has really highlighted some
of the key issues that we think are
really important. How do we make sure that
folks like Sebastian and Diana have an
opportunity to go to college? He’s introduced legislation
to make sure that students understand how
much money they’re borrowing and how to use that effectively. He’s made sure to introduce
legislation to take care of Foster Youth, so
that the students that have the least
access and preparation for college can actually
get there. He’s also addressed
something that maybe many of us don’t think of
or take for granted, but how do we make
transportation affordable for students? When we talk about free college
for our neediest students in California, we have to
remember that college isn’t just about tuition and fees. It’s about all the other
costs that become barriers for low income students. And we’re proud that you have
really tackled all those issues, so thank you. Thank you for your leadership. So just a quick introduction to
who we are as an organization. As the Assemblymember mentioned,
our focus at the Campaign is to make sure that more
Californians can go to college and that once they actually
get there, once they walk through these doors here
at PCC, that they complete, that they transfer
or they graduate. And we care a lot about these
issues, and I’ll always say for two critical reasons:
One, because, you know, like Sebastian and other
students, I’m the first in my family to go to college. And so one of the things I’m
most proud of and my team loves to put this picture of me
graduating from college up, is the fact that I did
graduate from college. And I think for many of us in
this room who did go to college and graduate, we know
that it was life-changing. My mother only had a
sixth grade education, worked mostly minimum wage jobs. And when I graduated from
college, my first job out of college, I
made more money than my parents combined
income alone. And for low income students,
that is what college does. It really is I think the promise
that we call The American Dream or The California Dream. It’s the reality that it
doesn’t matter where you start from that we all
have that opportunity and that chance to get there. And so that is what drives
our passion for making sure that more students have that
opportunity in California. But the second biggest driver
is the reality that, you know, that is what California needs —
that all of us need to make sure that more students can go
to college and graduate, because we live in a
society that is better when we have a more
educated workforce. So our focus at the
Campaign has really been about pushing greater
college access, making sure that there’s
completion once students get here, that it’s affordable, and
just as importantly and part of why we’re having
this conversation is that we make sure that it is so
for every single ethnic group in our state — that everybody
truly does have the opportunity to reach their American
Dream and get an education. And unfortunately, I
get to come up here and tell you how
we’re falling short. But I think fortunately, this conversation is
completely centered on what we can do about it. And the panel conversation is
about what are the strategies and how can we all
advocate to make sure that we make things
better for California? So I’m going to share some
findings from research that we have done on the
state of higher education. We do a series of these reports. We believe it’s incredibly
important to disaggregate the information
by race and ethnicity, and so we do reports on Latinos,
on blacks, on Asian-Americans, and our Asian-American report
is the only report of its kind that disaggregates data for Asian-Americans beyond
lumping them all together to really identify
some of the challenges within some groups
in that community. And so I’m going to be sharing
with you how are we doing as a — as a state with regards
to Latinos going to college, being ready for college,
completing college. So those are some of the
data points that I’ll share. I hope you don’t all worry
about taking furious notes. If you want a copy
of the presentation, we’re happy to share
it with you. This is why this
matters, and I — I say this to every
crowd that I speak to. The — the doughnut is
California’s population. The orange is Latinos who
are the largest ethnic group in the state of California. If we break it down by
numbers, there are more than 15 million Latinos
in California. You see the proportional
representation there in our state. So I always say, this issue of educational attainment isn’t
important just for Latinos. If you’re a Californian, if
you care about the future of our state, then
you should also care about educational attainment for
Latinos in California regardless of whether you yourself
are Latino. Just some other very, you
know, important facts to share. I like to point these two out
because sometimes there’s a lot of misperception
about Latinos and — in our state and in our country. You know, I — I want you
all to understand and know that the majority, not just the
majority, but almost, you know, 96 percent of Latinos
under 18 were born here. We’re not talking
about immigrants or undocumented folks. The majority of Latinos in California were
born in this state. One out of every two under,
you know, person under 18 in the state is Latino. So, if you go back to that chart where I just showed
you the percentage of Latinos is 39 percent, right
now if we look at under 18, 50 percent are Latino. So all you have to do is, you
know, project out and assume that this part of the
doughnut is going to continue to get bigger and bigger. And so there is work to do
to improve the outcomes. So I’m just going to share some
of these data points with you. This chart is — shows you
educational Attainment. The one in the middle — I’m not
sure if I have a pointer here. I do, yes, okay. I’m going to stand — Can you
hear me if I stand out here? Yes?>>Yes.>>If you can’t hear me, I guess
you wouldn’t say, yes, right? Okay, let me know if I
need to speak louder. I think I project okay. But here in the middle is
Latino Educational Attainment. But you can see that
we’re actually showing it for every single group. The — the critique I have a lot
of times when data is shown is that we show this —
this part right here. So we look here, we see
that 33 percent of adults in California have
a Bachelor’s degree, eight percent have some
— an Associate degree. The green is some college. This kind of grayish-blue,
it’s a high school diploma. So you can see high
school diploma across, and then no high school
is the darker blue, okay? So this is an important
comparison point. You can see what it looks
like for the whole state, but you can see that
there’s huge differences when you disaggregate
the information by race. What I think is really
important now — I’m going to focus
on Latinos today. I know the Assemblymember
held a session on — on Black Educational
Attainment — Thank you. I thought I was doing
okay, but I appreciate it. I don’t have to yell. So, you know, this is why
disaggregating data is so critical because you can see
here the huge variety, right? We have huge differences
in educational attainment, Bachelor degree holders
is the dark, you know, the darker-orange
here at the top. And this is where we are
with no high school diploma at all, okay. And this is for folks over 25,
so we’re not counting folks under 25 in this chart. Well, you can see here is
that for black Californians, 32 percent, a third of them have
some college, but no degree. So that’s an important
point to understand because the interventions
for how we address that, how we get more black
Californians to get a college education would
be a critical piece here, right, and not so critical
if we’re talking about some of the other groups. For Latinos, you can see that Bachelor degree
attainment is ridiculously low. Only 13 percent of
Latino Californians have a Bachelor’s degree. How many of you have
a Bachelor’s degree? Raise your hand. So you are very much
part of this 13 percent. In this room, it
seems like 80 percent, but definitely not the norm and
not what we have in the state. So you can see some
huge challenges here. So, now I’m going to talk a
little bit about admissions and — and here I’m
— I’m going to go into real specific
data and information. So again, I shared — This —
this blue bar is very important. Okay, it’s not like,
you know, when you — What’s the game that you play
where you go under the bar?>>The Limbo.>>The Limbo, yes. We do not want to do the limbo,
but we are doing the limbo here. Because then every single
place in every category that we measure in
terms of Latinos in higher education,
we are under the bar. We are unrepresented. The bar would be for us, equity. It would mean that if 18 to
24-year-olds are 50 percent of our population in California,
then about 50 percent should be in each one of these
categories, right, about 50 percent California
community colleges, students should be Latino. Right now, it’s only 45
percent, so we’re closest in the community college system. Many of you who work
in community colleges or have attended know that
that tends to be, if Latinos go on to college, they go
to community college. 39 percent of Cal State
students are Latino, 23 percent of UC
students are Latino. And then these are private
not-for-profit colleges like Stanford, USC, the
Claremont Colleges, 24 percent. And then these are private for
profit colleges: DeVry, ITT, some of those campuses, some
of which have now been shut down because of bad practice. So what we have seen is that
there’s been a huge increase in — in college preparation and
college going and applications. I won’t read all of
these statistics to you, but you can see that if as
we did a comparison from 2000 to 2016, the number
of applicants to the Cal State has
increased significantly. The number who have been
admitted in terms of Latinos, again we’re talking just Latinos
has increased significantly, and those enrolled has increased
but not as significantly. And that is related to an
issue we’ll raise later in terms of solutions. What we do see at the Cal State
is that — And I think I — I like to point this
out because, you know, in California, one
of the amazing things that we established in
the 1960 was a broad and open access to
higher education. Our leaders in 1960
through the master plan for higher education,
said we need to send many more
Californians to college. We are going to establish a free and affordable public
university system. The UC, the CSU and the
community colleges grew significantly as a result. And the Cal State in
particular was always envisioned as an open access university. While you do have to meet
certain requirements like the A through G courses in high school
to be admitted to the CSU, the idea was if you
met that standard, you would be able to get in. The UC has a much more
rigorous standard. It’s a research institution. It’s a competitive
system, but the idea was that CSU would be
fairly open access. I say that because we kind
of take it for granted today that it is so hard
to get into the CSU. And sometimes the response is,
well students should try harder. But what I want to remind
folks is while Diana is a — is an easy admit into UCLA,
she also actually shared that she took ten AP courses
and passed all her AP exams. So, thankfully I can say
I was an admit to a UC when I applied over
20 years ago. But I know for a fact
that it’s highly unlikely that I would get in today. And I think we need
to have a conversation about whether that’s
acceptable or not. [ Applause ] We sort of take it for granted. Well here’s the bar, you know. And what happens when we
don’t fund our colleges and universities sufficiently? This is what happens. You have a UC system that
keeps raising the bar for admitting students,
a UCLA campus of which I’m a proud Bruin
that has the most difficult, you know — It is the
most difficult campus to get into, one of. And now you have
Cal State campuses that are incredibly impacted,
an internal word that I don’t like too much, but it’s the
word that they use to say, okay, we have more eligible applicants
than we have spots for. So now we’re going declare these
majors impacted at our campuses, and that means if
you want to attend, if you want to be a psychology
major, you’re now going to have to meet a much higher bar. Now isn’t that necessary
to be a psychology major? It’s not necessary. It’s necessary because I
don’t have enough space, and I have to have a process
by which I weed people out. And so again, if we don’t demand that our state leaders
properly fund our universities, this will continue to get worse. And there are campuses
right here, Fresno, Cal State Fullerton, Long
Beach, San Diego, San Jose, San Luis Obispo where all of
their majors are impacted. And then there’s
campuses where almost all of them are impacted
including Cal State LA, okay? Now as a parent or a
student, try figuring out — It’s like when —
figuring out a — a, you know, the
trail, how do I get in? Which major should I apply to that might give me the
best chance of getting in? Well if I want to
go to Long Beach, you know, what — what do I do? What’s the strategies? So we are making it
harder and harder for students to get in today. And in fact, if we just look
back in 2009 at the beginning of the recession, this is
how many eligible students at the Cal State University
were — were turned away. And at the University
of California, obviously this is
also a huge issue, as we continue to raise the bar. And the top six campuses of the
University of California are, you know, places where it’s
nearly impossible for Latino and black students to get in — two-thirds of them in
fact were turned away — these campuses, a
little more likely. I’m giving you a — a preview. On our website, you can actually
find the full report called Access Denied that speaks
just to this particular issue. And I want to tell you, I
think this is really powerful because we don’t speak
to this as much, right? Latino applications at the UC,
this is at UC Berkeley and UCLA, so this is post-Prop 209, the
end of Affirmative Action, Latino applications of 350
percent in that time period. This is the percent of
Latinos admitted, the increase. So I always — I — I do
make fun of the UC sometimes, and they — Some of my
UC friends tolerate me. But the UC is very proud of
the growing number of Latinos at their campuses
and they should be. You — you saw the
percentage earlier. But if we were talking
about equity, it really should be closer — closer in alignment
to the number of Latinos in the state, right? And we have work to do to make
sure that students are prepared. But I always say when
they get excited and talk about how there’s more
Latinos at their campuses, it’s like the rooster taking
credit for the sunrise. There’s more Latinos
applying, 350 percent more. There’s more Latinos
in California. Inevitably, there’s going
to be more Latinos at UC. That doesn’t mean they’re
doing a good enough job. So you’re probably asking, well, how many Latinos
ready for college? So — so we’re going
to talk a little bit about college preparation
here and some of the hurdles, right, facing our community. So just so you know, only
nine percent of Latinos in 2014 attended the top
20 percent high achieving high schools. So, that means that
91 percent of Latinos in California are attending
lower achieving high schools. Only three in ten Latinos
have taken and passed the A through G curriculum
required for admission to the UC and the CSU. And then once Latinos get
to college, over 80 percent of them are placed in
pre-college level courses. And that’s also true for
several other ethnic groups as you can see here. But when we talk
about solutions, you’ll hear me address
this as well. Just to give you a pictorial
image of what it looks like in terms of the number of
Latino students that are placed in remedial education, you
could fill the Coliseum one and a half times over. And my team loves to
put USC there because, you know it bothers
me, but it’s okay. So I just want to as we
approach kind of some of the last few data
slides, give you a picture of where Latinos are in
terms of college completion. So if you look at
Latino students that enter community
college, only 40 percent after six years complete
a degree, certificate or transfer, six years. How many of you thought that
was a two-year experience? And you know, it’s better,
certainly at the University of California, but only half of Latinos are completing
in four years. And these are the top performing
students from high school. And at the Cal State,
it’s incredibly ridiculous at only 12 percent
completing within four years, just over half after six. So obviously our community
faces a lot of barriers and challenges, a few of which
I’ve already covered here. You know, some of
them, and we — we pictured it this way are
things that students carry sort of before they even get to
the college door, right? If you’re low income, if
you’re first generation, you don’t have a network
of support to get you ready and through college, if you’re
attending a low performing school, as was cited earlier. And then when you get
to the start lines, you’re kind of carrying all
this stuff, you’re then thrown into precollege level courses. Your chances of success are
even further diminished. If that’s the case, if the
state doesn’t provide sufficient funding, you probably don’t have
a chance to see a counselor. If you show up at a
community college, the counselor ratio
shows 600 to one. So what’s the chance that you’re
going to actually sit down and talk to somebody and get
the proper guidance to end up at the finish line, right? And then there’s a broken
transfer pathway, right, where students have to figure
out very complicated process for getting to the four-year
university if that’s their goal. So, now that I have
properly depressed you all, I want to segue into
so what if, right, if we did things differently, if
we were able to close the gaps? So this — this is really
if we close the gaps by race in California, this
is what we would have. And I think this is more
than just a personal story of it’s amazing that, you know,
I got to go to college and — and the change that
happened in my family because I got to go to college. But as a state, if we
didn’t have a racial gap in college going in
completion, we would have more than a million more
educated workers. We would increase our
income in California by 135 billion dollars, and
you would have 790,000 more four-year degrees. So, it’s pretty substantial
what would happen. So, as we kind of segue
into the panel conversation. You know, we wanted to
throw up a few things that we think are most
important in terms of how we close the gaps. And I’m — I’m not going
to get incredibly specific, but I do beyond what you
see here, these nine points, I do want to share that, you
know, we need state leaders to say that this is important
to them and to identify a goal. In 1960, visionary state
leaders said, we are going to have a master
plan for education. Many of us in education think
that somehow the master plan was like the Constitution
of the United States, intended last forever. And it was a 15-year plan. And so what I’m proposing is
that our state leaders need to be thinking about what
is the 15 or ten-year plan for California to address
the challenges we face. And how are they going to
fund them and pass policies to ensure that we get there? We have sort of included a
wide-range of recommendations because what I shared
with you are a variety of challenges we faced. There are the challenges
of college preparation and so we talk about how do
we expand college knowledge in middle school
and in high school? We’ve got to start
talking to students now and to their parents about how
do you even get to college? What do you have to do? We have to make sure that it’s
actually affordable for folks and that they know
it’s affordable. So I always say that, you know,
the idea of going to college and — and accessing financial
aid, that reality only exists if you know about it, right? If you have the perception
that college is expensive and there’s no money for you, then college is not
anything real in your life. And so we have to make
sure that — that — that message is communicating. We have been strong advocates
about pushing colleges to do a much better job and for
our state to do a better job in terms of funding, in
terms of the pathway. Streamlining transfer — So we
fought very hard in California and with the support of the
legislature and the governor to pass the Associate
Degree for transfer. That guaranteed students a
clear way in community college to earn a degree
and to be eligible and guaranteed admission as
juniors in the Cal State system. It is a growing pathway. It’s becoming much more popular, but it isn’t the
preferred pathway yet. And so we need to do a lot more. And we also need
to really be clear about holding colleges
accountable. I hope every college is
disaggregating their data by race and communicating what
they’re doing to close the gaps and to support student’s
success. So you should ask your local
college if they’re doing that and how they can do that better. We support reinstating the
use of affirmative action in higher education in line with the Supreme Court’s
decision to do so. [ Applause ] I’m a proud beneficiary
of Affirmative Action. I suspect many of
us who are older in this room to have also been. And the reality is that whatever
it takes to get more people of color educated in
California is a good thing, and we should all be
fighting for that. So these are, you know,
just a few examples. I will stop because I think
we’re running a little bit late. But I hope this was helpful
in terms of giving you a sense of what some of the
big challenges that face our state look like
and what we can do about it. I think we are very excited
by the reality that more and more people are talking
about college completion, that we’re talking about
improving transfer, that we are reforming
remedial education. We have a bill in front
of the governor now that will require
community colleges to use high school GPA instead of the Assessment Test
to place students. And part of that is because
we are tired of seeing so many students inaccurately
placed in remedial education without a way to get out of it. And so — [applause] Since
I have a captive audience, I will ask each and
every one of you to call Governor
Brown’s office and to say that you support AB705. Because those are the kinds
of reforms that we need to make sure happen
and your leadership in that space will be helpful. And Assemblymember
Holden, thank you again for knowing how important
this issue is and for being an advocate
for us in Sacramento. And we look forward to
continuing to work with you in partnership and with all
of you here in the community. Thank you. [ Applause ]>>Thank you so much
Michelle for being with us. Michelle’s my boss, so I’m
going to say really nice things. Wasn’t she great? My name’s Audrey Dow. I’m the Senior Vice-President
at the Campaign for College Opportunity, and
really have the great fortune of meeting all of the panelists
here tonight and working with them to put on
this forum this evening. And so we’re going to jump right in to our conversation this
evening to talk a little bit about the data, but
as Michelle shared, to talk about the solutions that
are in front of us and what some of our local campuses are doing
day in and day out to ensure that Latino students on their
campuses are successful. So I want to just take a minute to introduce everyone
on the panel. We have Dr. Michaela
Mares-Tamayo, who’s the Director of Student Equity
at Pasadena College. Join me in welcoming her. [ Applause ] Right here to my left is
Dr. Cynthia Olivo who’s the Vice-President of
Student Services here at Pasadena City College. [ Applause ] All around superstar. We have Dr. Octavio Villalpando
who’s the Vice Provost for Diversity and Engaged
Learning Chief Diversity Officer for Academic and Student Life
and a professor of education at Cal State Los Angeles. [ Applause ] We have Dr. Beatriz
Gonzalez, who’s a Vice Provost and Chief Diversity Officer of the University of
La Verne, welcome. [ Applause ] And one of my sisters in arms, Raquel Simental who’s the
Director of External Relations and Communications at
the Education Trust-West. Thank you for being with us. [ Applause ] So Dr. Mares-Tamayo, we’re
going to kick it off with you. What are our colleges and
universities need to be aware of when a student
is first generation, when they’re low income and
they’re potentially coming from an under-resourced
high school? What do we need to be thinking about when those students
walk in our doors?>>And to answer that
question, I really want to draw our attention back to
0.7 that Michelle presented about improving institutional
cultural competency. And so colleges and
universities need to be aware that our first generation,
low income and potentially from under-resourced
high school students come with high aspirations
and limitless potential. So rather than viewing them
from a lens that’s focused on what they may “lack,” we need to recognize the strengths
they bring and search for ways to build on them. And I think there’s three ways
that we really should be looking at our institutions to do that. The first is through
professional development for faculty, staff
and administration, because there’s specific
pedagogical techniques and institutional policies
that can be adopted to center students’ experiences. And it basically boils
down to not just assuming that all students are the same
or automatically know what to do or when to do it. And if we flip that script a
little bit, it will actually by making those equitable
shifts, actually serves all
students better. So it’s — it’s a
win-win, right? The second point in terms
of institutional commitment to supporting programs that
share that kind of work, if you look at, like,
UCLA for example, the Center for Community
College Partnerships at UCLA, works relentlessly to develop — to deliver information to
our students and communities in culturally affirming
and sustaining ways and build upon the networks
of support that exist within our students and
within their families. Also, there’s the first-year
experience under the leadership of Dr. LaTonya Rease-Miles it’s
really working on this First To Go initiative that affirms
first generation status as a good thing, right, not
as something to be ashamed of, but really as a key piece
of that college experience. And then finally, I think
institutions really need to again, commit to developing
those programs even further, like a CCP or the
First To Go initiative. But then also communicate
with parents and family in meaningful ways, because
our parents may not have formal education or advanced degrees, but really what they do not
have is institutional knowledge and that’s very different than saying they’re
somehow uneducated or unable to support our students. And really it should
be the responsibility of the institutions to
share that knowledge and ultimately build
those bridges.>>Thank you so much. [ Applause ] Dr. Olivo, I’m going
to go back a little bit on Michelle’s slides here. I thought it was pretty
striking looking at this picture of the Rosebowl with USC
— I’m sorry, the Coliseum. Did I say Rosebowl? The Coliseum.>>I got you Audrey.>>It’s much for
beautiful at the Coliseum. But, you know, the
idea that we have so many students being placed
into precollege level courses where we know so few will ever
make it through seems daunting.>>Yes.>>But, I think there is a
silver lining, especially here at PCC about the ways
in which that you’re — you’re rethinking how you can
get students ready and to be — to be successful in
college-level Math and English. So, can you share
with us a little bit about what you’re doing?>>Absolutely. Thank you very much. So, some of the practices
we’ve engaged in over the past two
years especially have been in including our faculty
in professional development around Cultural Competence and adopting an
Equity-Mindedness framework. What that means is
that it’s up to us as practitioners to
change what we do. It’s not requiring the students
to do all of the changing. College in and of itself through
the learning process provides that opportunity for
students to change. However, we’re also putting
a lot of the onus on students to go out and identify
information on their own. And so what we’ve done here
at PCC is we’ve held retreats in partnership with USC,
Center for Urban Education. And these have been retreats
for the English faculty, Math faculty, ESL, our
42 academic senators on our faculty senate group. And through these retreats, we have conversations
about our data. And it’s disaggregated
by race and ethnicity. As one can imagine, these are
not easy conversations to have. For example, our six-year
completion rate for our students at PCC is 55.4 — 55.4 percent
of our students who complete, who start six years ago. That is our overall
completion rate. We are an Aspen Top Ten College. For Latinos, it’s 42.9 percent. There’s still a lot
more that we can do to improve and we must do it. However, after we did
the cultural competence and Equity Mindedness
Training, we also brought in an external expert
to speak about the value of what Michelle was
discussing with AB-705, placing students based on high
school grade point average rather than a test score. And we did that this year. We brought in an
external expert. His name was John Hetz, and he conducted several
presentations across two days. I had him present to faculty,
staff and administrators here. And we decided to
adopt that method. As a result, several
thousand African-American and Latino students
this fall started in college level courses. [ Applause ] It is possible to
change our practices, but it requires intention
and a lot of hard work, and then also the willingness
to continue changing, one, because we know that our
students can succeed and two, it’s a — an economic
imperative for our state. So thank you very much.>>Thank you Dr. Olivo. [ Applause ] Dr. Villalpando, I’m going to
go back to again another slide that we were looking
at about representation in our segments and
proportionality. And we see overall at
the CSU that we have — that Latinos are 39 percent
of — of the CSU population, but at your campus,
they’re 60 percent.>>That’s right.>>Right? And so you are
definitely a Hispanic serving institution. I know that you’re pulling from
students in East Los Angeles and Central Los Angeles,
who are often coming from those very schools
that we’re talking about that are severely
under-resourced. They’re low income and
they are first generation. But I think again, we see
that your campus is rising to the opportunities
that are there. Can you talk to us a little
bit about what you’re doing?>>Absolutely, absolutely. Let me also thank you and — and Assemblymember Holden for holding this
very important forum. Cal State LA has an
undergraduate population about 78 percent of whom
identify as first generation, so it’s important to understand
the population of students that we’re working with. And the youth come from
schools primarily the east side, although our service
area extends up to Lancaster past
Palmdale, so it’s a very broad, but we tend to get mostly
first generation students. The university has also
seen an incredible — an incredible increase
in applications. So we are also becoming
a destination campus for many students in
Southern California. Last year, we received for
this current application cycle over 55,000 applications. So when you compare that to
the number of applications that UCLA receives, which is
something like 150,000, right, and you sort of compare
resources, we’re looking at apples and oranges, which
is why I appreciated the — the point that was made earlier. The issue is very complex. Institutions can do all
that we can to ensure that everybody has an
equal chance of succeeding, but without the resources, from
the legislature, to do our job, given the changing demographics,
it makes it especially difficult for campuses that have a
student population that has not for the most part been
well-prepared for college, okay. Now when we look at the
transfer students for example, our two-year graduation rate for transfer students is
close to 70 percent, okay. So we are working very
diligently to make sure that the campus is
responding to how our — our student body has
changed in general. Now I can go through the
same kinds of practices that my two colegas
here on the left and on the right have
just described in terms of cultural practices and — and faculty development
and so forth. But I can also share with
you that the recent decision by the California State
University system to phase out entry-level exams that
used to track students into remedial education
and further — further delay their
graduation that is going to change our graduation rates
in a very positive way, okay. So it’s important I
think to just to remember that Cal State LA’s
part of a large system of universities, okay. And every campus, we
do the best that we can in serving the population
of students that we can. I do want to make sure
that one of the takeaways that you all have today for
Cal State LA in particular is that we are the way
— we are the — We look like most institutions
will look in the next ten to 15 to 20 years, okay. We’ve already arrived
at that point. And so the success that
we’re able to achieve with a student body should
lend and provide some sort of potential best
practices for students, because we are seeing successes. This last year, and I’ll leave
you with this final point, Cal State LA was identified
as the number one institution in the country for upward
social mobility for students. So — so despite the challenges
that our student body rides with to the institution,
okay, first generation and their families, low
income families, okay, despite all those barriers, we
manage to impact their education in such a way that they are more
likely to go from the low 20 — 20thh percentile to the
upper 20thh percentile in socioeconomic status. We are higher than private
Ivy League universities. We propel students at a
higher rate to upper levels of social ability than
private Ivy League students. What does that tell you about
the investment that begins with certainly high
schools and below, but also with our
community college partners and then what we’re able to do
for students at Cal State LA?>>Thank you. [ Applause ] Dr. Gonzalez, you’re at
the University of La Verne, and when we looked at some of
the numbers, especially at — at the UC and — and at
the Cal State and we think about limited state funding,
going to those institutions, t there’s a real role for our
private nonprofits to play. How are you seeing your
role in terms of picking up and creating access for more
— for more Latino students and what are you doing around
recruitment and retention?>>Thank you very much Audrey. I appreciate that and
thank you very much to Assemblymember Holden
for having this forum and inviting the University
of La Verne to be a case study about what privates can do
to support Latino students. And you’re right, given the
capacity issues, we really have to look at private
universities as partners with the public university so that Latino students
do achieve and education. And let me for a moment
tell you a little bit about the University
of La Verne. When you hear private
university, certain images come to mind. And while we are 126 years old and we do have some beautiful
ivy-colored buildings, you may be surprised
about our mission and demographics
and our program. So just a couple of facts
about that, a few facts: 60 percent of our students
are students of color, 50 percent of whom are Latino. Half of our students come —
are the first in their families to attend college and about half
of them are Pell-grant eligible. So, it’s not Sanford. It’s not USC. It’s a different kind of place,
and we take a lot of pride and dedicate ourselves
to providing access to Latino students and other
underrepresented students. So what are some of the things
we’ve committed ourselves to not only to provide access
but to really help them graduate and attain the success and
even beyond recruitment and financial aid? And I would say that the
very first thing is the idea of intentionality. What’s that? It sounds kind of fuzzy? Well three years ago, we began
a very intentional conversation and a sustained conversation
about what it means to serve Latino students,
not merely enroll them. And we launched that
conversation at a State of the University Address. And that was actually
incredibly important because we were making
explicit our intention. And there’s something about
saying something out loud. I’m in the field of counseling
and when you work with a client who wants to try a new goal or
a new behavior, we often say to that person, tell
it to someone else. Tell someone else what you plan
to do, and even if you’re not into counseling, if you’ve
done a diet or exercise, they always say,
tell somebody else. Get a buddy, you know. So that keeps you going. It increases your
accountability. And the other thing about that
saying it out loud and say, this is what we’re going to do, we’re going to have this focused
attention on what it means to serve our Latino students,
it’s a form of testifying. And so — and there’s
weight to that. There’s value to that similar
to when Sebastian talked about his professors who —
his teachers who helped him, he didn’t say, I had
these great teachers. He named his teacher by name. So there’s something about
saying something out loud and labeling — naming
something that really matters. And for this conversation,
we had three ground rules. And the first is, I’m sure
Raquel will love this. It was going to be a
data-driven experience. We weren’t going to pull
things out of our hat. We we’re going to
look at the data. It was going to be disaggregated
and we’re not going to guess. We’re not going to presume. The second ground rule we gave
ourselves, and we said this out loud at the State of the — the Address, the
University Address, it’s not a zero-some game. So for Latinos to do well, other
people don’t have to do poorly. We just make a bigger pie and
that’s absolutely possible. So that’s similar to these
ideas of universal design, what might be good for
Latinos, it is going to — it’s going to help everyone. And finally the — third
ground rule was, Think Systems. Sometimes when you talk
about things like this, naturally conversations about
diversifying the faculty and staff will enter that. And sometimes defensiveness
comes up where an individual will
say, but I’m a great teacher. Just because I’m not of the
same ethnicity doesn’t mean I don’t care.” Absolutely you are. It’s not about you though. We’re talking about the system. So over the course of
the 50 or 60 professors that the student
is going to have, how many of them
represent them — get them? So, that was really important
for us, Think Systems, take it away from
the individual piece. Because it was a sustained
conversation, it became part of our strategic planning. And so for the last three years, the number one strategic
initiative out of four for Academic and Student Affairs at our university is
engaging our HSI identity. And that allowed us then to have
measurable objectives about it, and not just the typical ones
about graduation and retention of course, but goals about
diversifying our faculty and staff, about
changing our curriculum, about developing the diversity
confidence of our people and about the co-curriculums, so everything else a student
sees, touches, experiences. And just to give you a couple
of examples of all of these, because I’m — I’m
trying to be as concrete as possible to be helpful. So in terms of diversifying
our faculty and staff, we created a new Search
Committee Training Program. It’s two and a half hours long. You cannot be on a Faculty
Search Committee unless you’ve participated in that training. And we — we talk about some
real practical things besides expanding the pool,
besides having real good behavioral-based questions
about give me examples of how you did that thing. We also talk about things
like, oh, you have a candidate from Harvard and
you have a candidate from maybe a school
you don’t know as well, typically someone will say,
oh, get the Harvard person. That’s Harvard for
crying out loud. Well, it is and that’s awesome and that might be
the best person. But maybe the Harvard
person never was the adviser for a student group, never made
time for students after class. So that’s right. And just like publications, maybe someone has
fewer publications because they were busy
advising a student club, VSU or something like that. And I’m — I’m very happy to
say that after about a year of this program being
in place, this fall, 52 percent of our faculty
hires were underrepresented populations, black
and Latino faculty. So it is happening. [ Applause ] In terms of the curriculum, we are launching our Latino
Studies Program this year. We should’ve had
it a long time ago, but yay, we have it this year. And we’re moving to having a
required first-year course, grounded in diversity
and justice concepts. And we think that’s
really important so that everyone has
a common language about what we’re
talking about — everyone has a historical
understanding of what we’re talking about. And some [garbled audio]
the remedial courses. We were fortunate to receive
a Title Three grant for STEM that allowed us to run a summer
bridge program this summer in Mathematics, two
weeks on campus, residential for students. Every student went up by one
placement in Mathematics. A quarter of the students went up two placements
in Mathematics. So that means all the students who participated have
shaved a year off college, shaved a year off expense
of college, because if not, they would’ve been in
those remedial courses. So we’re moving to eliminate
remedial courses and instead so Summer Bridge,
so shifting our — our — where our money goes. The diversity confidence
of our faculty and staff, so we have four Diversity
Town Halls a year. We just had one last
night on the intersection of the First Amendment
in diversity and ethics. We have things like Safe Zone
training and Ally-ship training. But we also have regular
faculty and staff development that people can count on and — and that’s how our
programming will be this year. So every second Wednesday
of the month, it will be Diversity
Competence Training and all faculty and
staffing goes. So they know to count on it. Every Wednesday I can
go and I can get some– some training on this. In terms of the co-curriculum,
we launched a public art project because our students — We
also have listening sessions with our students, so
the Provost and I meet with them during
the academic year. And they gave us feedback that
this is a beautiful campus, but it doesn’t look like us. There aren’t things here that
represent us, that — that — that speak to our
sensibilities of who we are. So we formed a University
Arts Council for Public Art. A third of that counsel
is students, so there voice is present. And I’m very happy to say that we are unveiling
the first mural. So they’ve decided —
we decided on a series of murals for a panels. And the first mural
will be launched — it will be unveiled
officially at our Homecoming. And it is representative
beautiful Latina woman. And the title of the mural
is, And Yet They Persisted. Then — And in the
end, we’ll dedicate about a hundred thousand
dollars to that mural. And it is a big deal in
the city of La Verne. And it wasn’t all smooth, but we
— we kept on with the project. Thank you. [ Applause ]>>Thank you Dr. Gonzalez. Raquel, I’m going to come to you
next, and I’m going to go back on the slides one more time. You know, sometimes, I
think that the Campaign for College Opportunity has
done a lot of reports on — on the state of — of higher
education in California where we’re looking at race
and ethnicity and we — we show graphs like this, and we’re not always
the most popular with institutions or
with other groups. That’s for sure, and I think that at Trust-West has often
been in that boat as well. But data’s important and it shouldn’t always
be the outside advocates that are the ones
shining light on the data. And we clearly have some best
practices here at the table of institutions that
are unafraid to look at their data as
a starting point. But can you share a little bit
with us about the importance of thinking about longitudinal
data systems for the state and looking P through 20 if
we’re getting really serious about improving outcomes
for Latinos?>>Thank you Audrey. And thank you Assemblymember
Holden and everyone for attending this very
important conversation. I also want to start by thanking
the educators and administrators in the room, both along — along
this table and in the audience. And I also want to thank — I see Trio and folks
with Puente shirts on, and these are the folks
doing the hard work to really uplift
our Latino students, making sure that they’re
getting to and through college. And they have the data
to prove that it works. These are evidence-based
practices and I’m really excited to hear my colleagues to — to the right of me talking
about how they are adapting to students and not expecting
students to adapt to the system, but how can the system
adapt to students and meet them where they are? In terms of using data to
really tell the story, you know, data is a civil rights issue. And before I get too far
into this conversation, I just want to acknowledge the
context in which I’m talking about data and the data
longitudinal systems, especially in a Latino
community and the fact that we’re experiencing
persecution really. And when I talk about
data and data systems, I want to make sure that
I’m clear that I’m talking about data that is safe,
data that’s confidential of our students and data
that is going to be used to drive decisions
and promote equity. And I just want to acknowledge
that because we — we — Our — our community has fear right now about the data that’s
being collected. So I just want to be clear
that when I’m talking about these imported data
systems that the state of California either needs
to build or turn on and — and use to promote
equity and to ensure that our Latino students are —
are accessing higher education, I want to be clear
about what that means. So, we know that data is used
to document inequities and — and, you know, Assemblymember
Holden started us off about, you know, we’re here to talk
about what are those barriers, how we can remove
those barriers, how the system is working or
not working for Latino students. And you can’t have
that conversation if you don’t have the data. And we know that data is used
to in other areas like housing and voting and employment, and so it’s no different
with education. Investing in longitudinal
data systems that are going to tell us how students are
faring, what are their access to good schools, fair
funding, decent facilities, quality teachers,
rigorous courses, everything that you
need to be ready to — to enter the halls
of higher education. So without a good data
system, we also can’t see and correct the inequities
that — that exist that these
students are experiencing. And without this longitudinal
data and other data systems, right, my colleagues to the right can’t make
evidence-based decisions and improve the quality
of education for California students. They have their own data, but imagine if we had included
the links between, you know, P12 and post-secondary data
systems so that we could track to see how well our public
school system is preparing out students for college. And, you know, 37 states
have this longitudinal K12 through college data systems
and 16 states track students from K12 through the workforce, and California sadly
is not one of them. You know, we can
also — There’s — Michelle talked about
the disaggregation, and actually this is the site
that she was talking about, you know, disaggregating the
date of educational attainment. But, you also need to
disaggregate this by gender. And that’s something that California certainly does
not do is disaggregate student data by race and
gender because we know that the subpopulations
experience schools in different ways. At Trust-West just released in June a report
called Hear My Voice. It’s a — a counter-narrative
storytelling about — about young men of color
and their accessing, it’s creating the
pipeline for college. And it really uplifts the voices
of students about the barriers that they encounter through
their eyes, through their voice. And — and — and in there, I encourage if you’re an
institutional leader either in the K12 or postsecondary or
postsecondary best practices at some of these institutions
that are serving a high number of young men of color are doing
so that more of them and based on what the data that we — we saw today, how
we need to make sure that our Latino students,
especially Latino young men of color who have degree
attainment disproportion lower than female Latinas or
Latinas, Latin-X actually. So that in itself
right there is — is a conversation
starter as well. So I leave you with that,
and I think in the K12 system if you’re, you know, an
administrator in the K12 space, you know, also a — a longitudinal data
system to track teachers, where are our qualified
teachers? Are they being disproportion — are they teaching in disproportionately
under-resourced schools? And also collecting data on the
experiences of students, parents and teachers, so, right,
we don’t have a data system that talks about what are —
how are the school climate, parent engagement and teacher
working conditions as well? But in postsecondary education, building a longitudinal data
system that connects both P12 and postsecondary data systems
would be very, very useful. Thank you again. [ Applause ]>>So we have about ten minutes
before we ask the audience for questions, so I hope
that you’re starting to think about what you would like to
ask some of the individuals here on the panel, but I do want to
use the last ten minutes of — of just this panel
to talk a little bit about the recommendations
that Michelle presented that, you know, the committee
also had a hand in drafting. And I’m going to not pick
on any one in particular. I’m going to put them back
up here on the screen. So we have nine recommendations
here, everything from a new statewide
plan, aligning P20 data systems, doing away with Affirmative
Action, improving institutional cultural
competency, and, you know, to Dr. Gonzalez’ point, hire to reflect the diversity
of the student body. What do you think about
these recommendations? And — and if you were
someone here in — in the local district
wanting to really see a policy or practice implemented
to make a difference, what would you be recommending? And just grab the mic. Anybody.>>Well, I would say equal
employment opportunity training is something very easy that
each institution can fix. For example here at PCC, we
used to have an outside firm from a — a lawyer
company come in and conduct the EEO training
which was very basic. And two years ago, we switched
to a different model to bring in an expert on cultural
competence. Her name is Dr. Chris
Collinun [Assumed Spelling], and we had a group from the
Pasadena City College Safe Zone Coalition who identified her
at the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity. And now Dr. Collinun
conducts all of our equal employment
opportunity trainings at PCC. We did see a difference because
she trains committee members on how to identify cultural
competence and candidates. That is something easy
that institutions can fix to go beyond just the
compliance-based EEO training from a legal perspective and go
really deeply into what is it to be culturally competent? And how do you identify
cultural competence in materials from candidates?>>Dr. Villalpando.>>I — I think probably
the single most important recommendation that —
that college opportunity — Campaign for College
Opportunity has come up with is the possibility
of rescinding Prop 209, because that — that proposition
has had among the most far reaching negative effects in
postsecondary education — in the history of
postsecondary education in the state of California. Because it has caused us
to think about practices that are allegedly race-less
or race-blind or race-neutral, which is an impossible task —
and impossible task to follow. And so it requires a sort of
contort ourselves in all sorts of directions to try to meet the
— the — the spirit of the law, certainly the, you
know, the — the — the legal implications of not
doing that is very important. But also has driven
underground the conversation about discrimination
that continues to exist in our society. So, to me, once we approach the
existence of Proposition 209 and its negative effects
that has now been close to — we’re going on two generations
now of losing students, once we approach that openly
as a state, we’re talking about a very different approach
to postsecondary education, one that probably is much
more economical by the way, because then we don’t have to
talk about particular services for a community that is — where
the services are devoid of race, okay, allegedly or additional — additional resources to
try to enhance success of other communities that
would be displaced otherwise if it weren’t for the fact
that we try to be race-blind. So, it just makes absolutely
no sense in this day and age to continue to hold on to this
notion of race-blind society, given the population
of the state of California in particular. [ Applause ]>>I want to — This is Raquel. You know, the Education
Trust-West, in addition to, you know, championing the
need for data, so I’ll get off that soapbox, then I’ll
move onto number five, Strengthening Financial
Aid/Support. At Trust-West, she has a
financial aid tracker you can access via our website
that shares the FAFSA rates of high schools in districts. And we think that
that conversation of college affordability
is a very important one for Latinos right now to have. Our upcoming report, which is
titled the Majority Report, Uplifting the Success of our
Latino Students in California, we’ll be releasing that report
in mid-October, and if you’d like to make sure that
you get an electronic copy of the report, you can go
to TheMajorityreport.org and enter your email,
and you’ll be one of the first to receive it. We talk about how
needing, you know, from the state policy level,
providing more financial support for low income students
to attend colleges and how increasing the Cal-grant
awards is certainly a piece of that for our students,
but also working with great counselors in high
schools, encouraging them to, you know, re-champion
AB-2160 which is legislation that made it mandatory, although
we’re having actually challenges in implementation of this law of having high schools
upload the data — I’m sorry the GPA verification
for students straight to the California
Student Aid Commission. That’s removing a barrier of
putting the onus on the student to have to — to do that, right. How can the system again support
our students and promote equity? So we really believe that the
financial aid pieces are very important conversation
for Latino students. We know that’s a barrier to access often times
higher education. I know as a first generation
college student myself, my parents are, like, yeah,
you know, college is fine, but we don’t have any money. So — so if you can —
if you could figure out, because my parents
are immigrants, how to pay for college,
then great. But if not, you know, we can’t
— we can’t take out a loan. We can’t mortgage the house, so those are some
real conversations that our Latino families
are having. So, an emphasis on — on college
affordability I think is — is another big piece
of this conversation.>>Is there anyone else? And again, you know,
thank you to everyone who came this evening and I
would highly encourage you if you haven’t already
done so to please sign in on the table that’s in
the back corner right there, because we do have space
for either your email or phone number,
because that way, we can send out information
to all. Because there were a lot of great resources
mentioned this evening. And I think on that note, I
would encourage us to think about how we then take this
information and share it with people who weren’t here. Because if you look around,
there’s some amazing colegas or colleagues, there
are community members, administrators, teachers who are
here, and then there are some who are not — That’s my son. My son is here, so, thank you
to him and my family for that. And being someone who’s from
Pasadena, very proudly born and raised here, this is pretty
historic because this is one of the very first events,
if not the only event of this kind that we’ve had. So I do thank Assemblyman
Holden’s office for that. At the same time — [ Applause ] And at the same time, there
are many other folks who need to be a part of this
conversation. So that means going
back to our schools, to our community members, to
our — our people and saying, you know, how are we
expanding college knowledge in middle and high school? And how are we doing that
not just for certain students in a certain, you know,
area of the campus or in certain classes, but how
we really doing that for all of our students and for
all of our family members to get invited into
that conversation? So, I think that’s
very important for us to keep in mind as well. Thank you. [ Applause ]>>Two things first:
You reminded us about having representation
in faculty and staff that look like our students,
which is super important for those underrepresented
students, but just as important for white students to hear
a divergent point of view and to know that a
Latino faculty member, a black faculty — yeah, that
Latino’s a rocket scientist or that person is a — is
a chemist or an artist. And that’s just as
important for white students, as it is for underrepresented
students. But I actually wanted
to say something related to what Octavio was
talking about. And so often the idea
is what’s scalable? What can — what best
practice can we take and apply over to another place? And this conversation a few
of us started after a meeting of HSI educators last
week on our campus. And the [garbled audio]
was talking about, but — is that really efficacious? Can that work in a
predominantly white institution, something that was a
predominantly white institution that now the students
have changes and yet the underlying foundation of that institution is
still predominantly white? Its ethos is still like that. Have you looked at
all the policies? Have you looked at the
practices, meaning the stuff that isn’t written down –>>Right.>>– the stuff,
the coded stuff? The stuff that —
that isn’t in policy. So I think a best practice
will never work in a — in another context like
that if we don’t take time for that kind of reflection.>>Yeah.>>Anyway, and those are the
insidious things that happen that keep people from
advancing, that keep us from diversifying
faculty that — that promote us to
implement admissions practices that aren’t fair and — and heavily reliant on
standardized testing. So that was a point. Thank you.>>So I know Faith Lee
is in the audience. Faith is with Assemblymember
Holden’s office and really has been the one
spearheading this entire event. So thank you faith for
everything you did. But I want you to take
notes on this very quickly, because I want to sum up
what the folks up here said about the recommendations. First, it’s clear that
a conversation needs to be continued on the region
around Latino student’s success. We heard a lot about the
need for there to be open, transparent and actionable data. We heard from Raquel
the importance of ensuring colleges affordable and that students know what
financial aid is available to them so that we’re not
leaving money on the table. We heard a lot about access and
overturning Proposition 209, but also within that, how do
we work within the confines of Prop 209 until it
is overturned to ensure that students really do
have access, and then a lot of conversation around the
need for cultural competency, the need to rethink this as
Dr. Gonzalez said so clearly, the ethos that’s
underlying our institutions that is what needs to change. And so how can we have
conversations about how as a region, we make
some new commitments to how our institutions operate? So that was fantastic panel. You guys are amazing. [ Applause ] We’re going to take the
next 20 minutes or so to hear from — from you. There is I think a
handheld mic going around or available here in the middle. I think we’re going until 7:30
Faith, is that right on Q and A? Yeah, okay. So if you come up and you
have a question for the panel, let us know who you’re
asking the question to. State your name,
your affiliation and if we could keep
it to a question, a very specific question and
not just general comments, that would be helpful. And as you get up the nerve
to come in line, I will throw out some — another question, but unless I see someone
biting at the bit. Come on up.>>Hello, hello. My name is Alejandra. I’m Sebastian’s mother. I’m the RN that graduated
from Pasadena City College.>>Yay. [ Applause ]>>I didn’t say that
to get a clap. But my question is in regards to
accountability and Dr. Octavio, you already have a
proven kind of a plan that works for Latinos. However, my son and my daughter
both attend Cal Poly San Luis Obispo where Latinos
are underrepresented, and I find that every single
time I speak with my son, he tells me, oh, such
and such dropped. And it happens to be a
Latino in the STEM program. So my question is, how can
you take your proven plan for Latino retention into all of
these underrepresented colleges? [ Applause ]>>So I think there
are two parts to or two potential
responses to your question. One goes back to Prop 209. You see, part of what
that has caused — created for us is the — is a
need to veil our conversations about culturally-based practices
as racially-neutral practices, so that we don’t — we
don’t expose the institution to unnecessary legal challenges
or unfounded legal challenges. So some campuses are in a
position where they’re willing to take those risks and
push those boundaries which by the way is one of
our taglines at Cal State LA, pushing — pushing boundaries to
the point where they understand that sound culturally, racially
informed practices have been proven by the research over the
last 50 years to be effective in helping students graduate. That’s the argument that we
make at Cal State LA We know that the data supports
our practices. We wouldn’t be doing
them otherwise. I — I will add that
we’ve just introduced a — actually it came
from the president and from the faculty together, a proposal to create our
first college in many, many years focused on race and
ethnicity and social justice, okay, that’ll house our
ethnic studies departments, gender and sexuality
and so force, okay. This is unusual and the faculty
at Cal State LA recognized that this isn’t — the
creation of such a — such a college isn’t
a PR proposition, it’s an educational imperative,
because it serves as a beacon to other campuses, right, into
other communities and families that our campus understands who
we are charged to serve, okay. And — and without having
that sort of clear view about the fact that we have to
serve this community that is so underserved across
postsecondary education, we’re not going to succeed. We’re not going to succeed. So, part of it I
think is also — I will also add one
final thought. The Cal State system has
launched a very aggressive plan to hire more chief
diversity officers at every institution, okay. And chief diversity
officers look differently at every institution, not
— not the way we look, but just in terms of our
— our scope of work, okay. But one of the most
important things is that we know what we need to do
is to begin to change the way in which — by which we
think about student success for diverse communities,
okay, very, very important. And to introduce the
idea that our students — our students that come from
Latino identities especially, have to be recognized
as holders of knowledge, as creators of knowledge
and as asset-based students that are going to improve
our institution, okay. So we — we take that notion
of cultural deficiency and turn it upside down, realizing that that doesn’t
fit the experience that we have with our students
at Cal State LA [ Applause ]>>Any other questions
for the panel? Come on up.>>Good evening. Thank you for the opportunity. My name is Mariana El la
Torre [Assumed Spelling]. I have three daughters that — Two graduated from Marshall
Fundamental and one is currently in Marshall in the
Puente Program. So my question to
Assemblyman Holden, excuse me, I’m a little nervous, is are Puente Program
what’s kept the funds from the state this year? And luckily the district
of Pasadena continue to support the program
for the next four years, but how can we prevent
this from happening again? What if in the next four years,
the district doesn’t want to fund Puente, how can we take
it back to the state for them to continue to fund
this program? And this relates to number four, the Puente Program gives the
students the information, the knowledge, but
colleges/universities, it opens their awareness
to all that. So how can we do that?>>Well — well thank
you for the question. First of all, I — I
support the Puente Program. My boys when they were at
Pasadena High School were in the program for
a period of time, and so it was really an asset
for — for children of all races and — and backgrounds. And I know that with the
local control funding formula, the idea was really to create an
opportunity for school districts to put the amounts
of money in the areas that they would like
to see it go. But I will say that where
there’s an opportunity and we’ll take a look at
the budget for next year, where we can maybe
send a message to. And — and this would be
helpful through this process. The governor will be presenting
his State of the State message in January to be
followed by presentation of his budget for
the ensuing year. And in that budget, we’ll
highlight sort of directions and priorities that he
would see to be important. The process then unfolds
where the legislature on both houses works
through the budget process, budget committees. And so I would say if you
could send me a letter to highlight the program, we
can then inquire about that. I’ll make notes tonight,
but we will inquire about it and make a — If the
governor is not funding it out at an appropriate level, then we can certainly
make a recommendation on additional funds
that we think need to go into the program. But it would be helpful
to get as clear direction at the local level as we can
so we can be very helpful when we get to the
budget process. But I do think it’s also
important for us to start for me and others to ask questions about the local control
funding formula process and how the funding is
being aligned with programs that the community
is really high on. And that’s what should
be happening as well.>>Thank you.>>Thank you. [ Applause ]>>Anybody else? I think one of the things
that has been on a lot of people’s minds are, you know, the uncertainty around
DACA students. And, you know, there are
students likely that folks in the audience are working with
that are possibly transitioning into college or some that
are already in college. What’s some of the advice? And where are some of the
places students can go to get information that
they need and maybe feel like they’ve armed themselves
with the best information that they can for what is
really an uncertain time?>>So thank — thank you
for that question Audrey, and I think that if we look
at — at PCC for example, there’s a lot of
really dedicated people who have been working
really hard to celebrate and to also support our
undocumented and specifically, our — our students who are
currently receiving DACA and are in a very tenuous position
now of — of losing that. And I do want to acknowledge
them in the audience today. So we have Javi, Hida
and James, who are part of our Safe Zones Coalition. If they could just kind of
waive their hands real quick. [ Applause ] And with, you know
— of course it helps to have the administrative
support through Dr. Olivo and many other folks here
on campus, but I think to — to answer the question
really, we need to understand that what’s happened with
the rescission of DACA or the taking away
of DACA is something that does not just impact
a small group of students. The number for LA County now
is about 55 percent of youth who live in a mixed
status family, meaning that they maybe
a citizen themselves, but a sibling or a parent is
undocumented or, you know, or could be receiving
DACA or not or — or TPS, right, which is another
important issue to be aware of that is — that provides some
form of protection currently for our students of
Central American background, but is also very much
in a tenuous position with a January 1st
sort of date coming up. That having been said, our —
our counselors, our teachers, our school administrators need
to know exactly what’s going on. There’s misinformation out
there in the sense of a lot of the focus of the
press conference from September 5th was that,
oh DACA will be in place for six months, and
that’s not true. Because really what
it is, is that those who currently have
DACA, if their — if their DACA expires
within the next six months up to March 5th,
they can renew it. However, that renewal
has to be submitted with a 495 dollar
application fee by October 5th. And so that information
is missing in, you know, kind of the one-liners or
the headliners that we see. So we need to understand that. We need to understand all the
resources that are available. There’s amazing community-based
organizations. Educators for Fair
Consideration is an amazing one. The website, WeAreHeretoStay.org
has a — a fabulous resources, sections that I highly encourage
people to look through that. And it’s in multiple languages,
a lot of their resources there. And so I think we — we
definitely need to be aware of where those resources are
getting them out to folks and really looking
at kind of the model that LA USD has set
forth, where LA USD has like a handbook that’s full
of resources and support for undocumented students
to really show that there’s that commitment and
there is that promise to serve all students regardless
of citizenship status. And really all of our
districts should have that. All of our colleges
should have that. And there are really good
organizations within colleges like Safe Zone centers or undocumented student
resource centers that we need to be familiar with,
need to know the people who are working there and
find ways to be allies outside of those institutions as well.>>We also have PCC
Facebook page called United without Boundaries, and
it’s maintained with all of the DACA Renewal Clinic
information that is happening in Los Angeles and I
would encourage you to please let students
know, counselors, teachers, everyone that can
spread this news. And I just want to, you
know, thank Michaela. I hired her in just
a few months ago and now she is the supervisor
over at the Safe Zone Center, which will open in
middle of December. And you can see we’re
in very good hands. [ Applause ]>>I just want to quickly
mention that on the kind of state policy level,
the advocacy that at Trust-West along
with others like the Campaign for College Opportunity
are supporting AB-699. Thank you Assemblymember
Holden for voting AB-699, which provides protections
for — for students — for undocumented students
and their families and limits the interactions
of ICE on public school sites
that’s K12 and — and public universities
and also SB-54, is — I think both of these
bills are on the — on the governor’s desk. And then, you know,
we should applaud, right, California’s efforts. We’ve got the California Dream
Act, you know, AB-540 students. And we have to continue
our advocacy. How do we strengthen that
program now more than ever? And so, you know, make sure
that you’re engaging in — in the state policy process
as well, because that’s — that’s going to ensure
uniformity and protecting all our students. Because we know that if we try
to do this county by county, school district by school
district, it’s not going to be implemented
uniformly, so it needs to — it needs to be state
policy to ensure that we are protecting all of our students no
matter where you live. [ Applause ]>>I know that there are
also a number of scholarships that are available
for individuals who need support covering the
495 dollar application fee, the Mission Asset Fund that is out of San Francisco
is the recipient of philanthropy foundations
coming together to support those fees. So if you go to
MissionAssetFund.org, I think it’s MIF.org,
there are — there’s a clear way on how you
can access those resources. And I think Alfred you
wanted to add something?>>Yeah. So I’m Alfred
Novera at UCLA. I wanted to also talk about
CHERLA [phonetic] having all of these different workshops and
doing them for free for students and families, but also I
want to applaud the president of the University of
California for her stand on undocumented students,
particularly in funding eight million
dollars to [garbled audio] over the last three years and
three years to come on services. So all of our campuses
have centers on our — at each of our campuses
with a director and support for students. In addition, we have
legal services. So any UC student, so if
you’re enrolled at a UC, you can get legal
services for you or your family regardless
of the situation. So, we want to make sure
that all students know that, because we have a lot of
students have mixed families where the student
might be documented but the parents are not. They can actually get services
for those parents who help them with the process and
so on and so forth. And in addition, I want to make
sure that we don’t focus only on DACA because there are
so many of our students that do not qualify for DACA, and we can’t forget how
important it is to include them in this discussion around
undocumented student services and access to resources. And then also we’re doing a lot
of fundraising to pay the fees. And I know that the University
of California has partnered with several different
organizations to fund the fees
for the students. So, if you know any UC students, you can get a hold
of us as well. And we are trying to advocate
them for that as well.>>Thank you. [ Applause ] I think we’re right
at 7:30, so with that, we’ll wrap up the panel. Thank you again everyone for
being with us this evening and having a productive
dialogue. [ Applause ]>>Yeah, I’d like to — We
just have a few more comments to share with you and to
make a quick presentation — to make a quick presentation. So before you leave — First again, let’s
just again thank our — our panel and let’s thank Audrey
for her being the moderator and doing a fantastic
job at that. [Applause] We thank
Michelle from Campaign for College Opportunities
for helping to shape and form the discussion
for this evening. It’s very important. I think you’ve heard sort of an
important give and take, and — and sharing of information
and knowledge that we need to connect to, and so
we appreciate that. You know, there’s also some
other people who are part of this community who have
really done their part to make a difference in terms
of uplifting the opportunity for Latino students to be
the best that they can be. And our Planning Committee for this forum thought
it would be a good idea and I thought it was a good idea
as well to recognize a couple of committee-based organizations
where the people that were part of those organizations have
been serving in a dedicated way to address the needs
of our young people. They are champions in education. And in the 41stt district, I’m
pleased to present a Certificate of Recognition to these
incredible organizations. The Community Leadership Award
goes to Adelante Youth Alliance. [ Applause ] Okay, I take it you’ve
heard of them. They — they have provided — It’s an organization based in
Pasadena that provides academic, professional and leadership
development for our youth. Since its inception, over
1700 youth have been involved in Adelante’s core youth
supporting programs and another 23 —
23,000, is that right?>>Yeah.>>23,000, wow, 23,000 in Adelante’s two annual
youth focus college career and personal develop conference,
Adelante Mujer Latina and Adelante Young Men. I would like to invite Stella
Murga, Executive Director of Adelante to come up and
accept this certificate. [ Applause ] [ Applause ]>>Thank you so much. This is such an honor. And I want to than Assemblyman
Holden who has been a champion of ours for a number of years
now and a champion of youth, especially underserved youth. His office has been very
supportive over the years and we know we can
always rely on him. We also want to thank PCC. This is like my second office,
so I know it like the back of my hand and all of
the PCC professionals, Melva Alvarez who’s a
partner at Madison with us, the Trio Program, I
mean, so many, Dr. Olivo. PCC has been a tremendous
partner hosting our conferences for 23 years now. So every year, now
we’re here twice a year, so I can’t thank you enough. And I receive this on behalf
of my very dedicated staff, Jose Madera, Christian Madera. And of course we have a number
of successful professionals here who volunteer for
our conferences. And this really belongs to them. There, please waive your hand. [ Applause ] So — And my husband as well. So Adelante Youth Alliance
is really the vehicle by which they share
their tips, their college and career journeys
with thousands of middle and high school Latinos
and Latinas and, you know hearing this
information just makes us want to do more and ensure that our
young people get the information they need to be successful. Thank you so much. [ Applause ]>>Our next award
or certificate we’d like to congratulate the
University of La Verne for being chosen for the
Institutional Leadership Award. [ Applause ] The University of La Verne has
made conscious effort to move in the direction of meeting the
needs of our diverse community by implementing a campus-wide
university strategic plan on diversity. The university also has
a very successful center for multicultural
services dedicated to fostering an environment
of exploration and empowerment of the diverse cultural
communities. I would like to invite Dr.
Beatriz Gonzalez to come forward and accept this certificate. [ Applause ]>>I’m honored to accept this
on behalf of the University of La Verne, not the
University of Awards. That would be something. And I also want to acknowledge
all my colleagues here from the University of La Verne. These are the folks doing
all the heavy lifting, making all of that happen,
so thank you all very much. [ Applause ]>>One of the colleagues
from University of La Verne is PCC alumni. I see her in the audience. [ Background Voices ]>>Speaking of being an alumnus
of a particular university, this young man over here, I’d
like to have him stand up. He’s got a great sweatshirt on. You can stand up. You know I’m talking
to you, okay. It says: San Diego
State University. That’s my school. Okay, both of you, alright. SDSU, Aztecs in the house. We’re going to wrap. And again, I want to thank
all of you for being here. I think that it — what we
were hearing underscores some of the issues that we
know that are out there, and even though we didn’t
focus on — on STEM education, I know that many of you are
very aware of how by 2025, we’re going to be a million
degrees short in the STEM field. And so whatever we
can continue to do, especially for our communities
of color, it’s very important because as we engage
with the Silicon Valley and the tech companies, they are
recognizing and they are looking for young people who can come
out and be able to fit the jobs that are being created. And so I think it’s very
important that we continue to focus on the science,
technology, engineering and math subjects because that’s
where the jobs are going to be, certainly here in California. And I also want to highlight the
fact that one of the barriers that we’re finding
and agreeing with is that 209 has done great damage
to creating opportunities for people of color to
be able to matriculate to the higher educational
system. And, you know, let’s just —
I’ll be very, very candid, there is an increase,
a very high degree of appetite amongst my
colleague to go back and take another look at this. And we were going to do
it a couple of years ago. The timing didn’t seem to be
right for one reason or another, but think it is very
critical that we get out arms around this issue, that
we go back to the voters. And let me just underscore,
elections matter, right. Elections matter because look
what happened here in 209. But also look what’s
happening in current terms. You know, so we had
to pass a resolution to challenge the president on his statements
around DACA students. And as a — as a legislative
body in the state of California and in the United
States of America to have to take your leader to task,
there’s something wrong with that, but it needed
to be done, and we did it, and we’re going to
stand behind — [ Applause ] — making sure that our
students are protected. Let me also just
make one quick point. The legislature has
been pressing very hard for some time now
and I think the UC’s and CSU’s have been
responsive to — to making sure that this
great university system that was created here in
California, that is also going to serve our young people
who live in California. And we have been seeing —
we’ve seen over many years a log out of state students, a lot
of out the country students who are coming to California
and getting a great education in our — in our UC/CSU system. That’s okay, but not to
the extent that it freezes out our kids, so we’ve been
pushing back on that as well. [ Applause ] And so just in conclusion,
you know, let me just say that there’s a lot
of work to be done. And the fact that this is when we did the Black Minds
Matter Hearing a couple of — a year or so ago, it was the
first time that had been done and so here we are addressing
the needs of our Latino youth, and this is the first time an
event like this has taken place. So we have to make
sure that what comes out of these conversations that
we can really start to put them into effect that we can really
start to change the system and start to make sure
that it is truly working for our young people,
because the state is becoming increasingly diverse. It’s already majority/minority. And that means the rest of
this country by 2050 is going to be majority/minority. So what are we doing today
to prepare for a very diverse and aggressive workforce? And what we’re talking about
today puts the wheels in motion and keeps us moving
in that direction. So, again, thank
you for coming out. Let me thank my staff,
Faith Lee. Let me also thank Hector
Rodriguez in the very back. You guys, great job. [ Applause ] And let me also just recognize
Dr. Olivo because she was with us with this from
the very beginning. You know, she came to
us with some great ideas of how this could come
together and so I really do want to single her out for her
great leadership in helping to make tonight happen. [ Applause ] So thanks for coming out
and have a great evening. It looks like we got food
in the back, so enjoy.